'Magic mushroom' in Queen Elizabeth II's garden

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Queen Elizabeth II and Buckingham Palace through the years
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'Magic mushroom' in Queen Elizabeth II's garden
LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 27: Queen Elizabeth II and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh leave Buckingham Palace in the Diamond Jubilee State Coach to travel to the Houses of Parliament for the State Opening on May 27, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - MAY 27: Queen Elizabeth II leaves Buckingham Palace in the Diamond Jubilee State Coach to travel to the Houses of Parliament for the State Opening on May 27, 2015 in London, England. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (C) walks to meet guests at a garden party held at Buckingham Palace, central London on May 12, 2015. AFP PHOTO / POOL /John Stillwell (Photo credit should read JOHN STILLWELL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - JUNE 13: Prince George of Cambridge is held by Prince William, Duke of Cambridge as Catherine, Duchess of Cambridge, Prince Harry and Queen Elizabeth II look out on the balcony of Buckingham Palace during the Trooping the Colour on June 13, 2015 in London, England. . The ceremony is Queen Elizabeth II's annual birthday parade and dates back to the time of Charles II in the 17th Century when the Colours of a regiment were used as a rallying point in battle. (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (L) and Prince Philip, Duke of Edinburgh (R) ride in The Queen's Carriage during the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour,' from Buckingham Palace to Horse Guards Parade in London on June 13, 2015. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
Britain's Queen Elizabeth II (C) arrives back at Buckingham Palace from Horse Guards Parade in a horse-drawn carriage preceeded and followed by marching guardsmen and other members of the royal family including Prince Charles, Prince of Wales (CL) riding beside the arriage during the Queen's Birthday Parade, 'Trooping the Colour,' in London on June 13, 2015. The ceremony of Trooping the Colour is believed to have first been performed during the reign of King Charles II. In 1748, it was decided that the parade would be used to mark the official birthday of the Sovereign. More than 600 guardsmen and cavalry make up the parade, a celebration of the Sovereign's official birthday, although the Queen's actual birthday is on 21 April. AFP PHOTO / BEN STANSALL (Photo credit should read BEN STANSALL/AFP/Getty Images)
LONDON, ENGLAND - DECEMBER 9: Queen Elizabeth II receives The Ambassador of Georgia Dr Revaz Gachechiladze and Mrs Mzia Marsagishvili as he presents his Letter of Credence at Buckingham Palace on December 9, 2014 in London, England. (Photo by Anthony Devlin - WPA Pool/Getty Images)
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LONDON (AP) -- A mushroom with hallucinogenic properties has been found growing at Buckingham Palace but no one suspects Queen Elizabeth II of cultivating the magic mushroom.

The Amanita muscaria was found growing wild in the extensive palace gardens during preparations for a television show.

The mushroom's hallucinogenic properties have long been known and it has commonly been used in rituals.

Palace officials said Friday there are several hundred species of mushrooms growing in the palace gardens, including a number of naturally occurring Amanita muscaria.

The mushroom can be beneficial to trees but can be poisonous to humans.

Officials say mushrooms from the garden are not used in the palace kitchens.

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