China's Nobel peace laureate sends message from jail

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China's Nobel peace laureate sends message from jail
A Chinese court has jailed the brother-in-law of one of China's leading dissidents. The verdict, handed down here on Sunday, sparked outrage among rights activists. They say the case was trumped up and is part of official retribution on the Liu family. Liu Hui was sentenced to 11 years in jail on charges of fraud. He is the brother-in-law of Liu Xiaobo, a Nobel Peace Prize laureate and critic of China's one-party rule. In a rare interview, Liu Xiaobo's wife condemned the verdict.
OSLO, NORWAY - OCTOBER 11: . A picture of the 2010 Nobel Peace Prize Laureate Liu Xiaobo is seen at The exhibition ?Be Democracy? at The Nobel Peace Center on October 11, 2014 in Oslo, Norway. (Photo by Ragnar Singsaas/Getty Images)
Former Chinese dissident leader Wu'er Kaixi (R) and activists hold a banner and a poster of jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, as they march during a rally in Tokyo on June 1, 2014, ahead of the 25th anniversary marking the brutal crushing of the Tiananmen Square protests. China's pro-Democracy activists gathered in Tokyo, commemorating 25 years after the crackdown calling for the world's pressure on Beijing. AFP PHOTO/Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Chinese dissident leader Wu'er Kaixi (C) and activists hold a banner and a poster of jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, as they march during a rally in Tokyo on June 1, 2014, ahead of the 25th anniversary marking the brutal crushing of the Tiananmen Square protests. China's pro-Democracy activists gathered in Tokyo, commemorating 25 years after the crackdown calling for the world's pressure on Beijing. AFP PHOTO/Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester has his head shaved in front of a poster of Liu Xia, the wife of Chinese Nobel Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, who was jailed in 2009, in Hong Kong on March 8, 2014. Protesters from the Liu Xia Concern Group shaved their hair off in support of Liu, who adopted a close-shaved hairstyle similar to her husband's and has been under house arrest since 2010 but has not been charged with any crime. The protest also marked International Women's Day. AFP PHOTO / Aaron Tam (Photo credit should read aaron tam/AFP/Getty Images)
A demonstrator holds a banner before a march to the China Liaison office as they rally in support of Liu Xia (seen on banner), the wife of imprisoned Chinese dissident and Nobel Peace Prize winner Liu Xiaobo, in Hong Kong on March 7, 2014. Liu, who has been under house arrest since 2010 but has not been charged with any crime, was admitted to hospital in Beijing with heart problems on February 20, 2014. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Former Chinese dissident leader Wu'er Kaixi (R) and activists hold a banner and a poster of jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, as they march during a rally in Tokyo on June 1, 2014, ahead of the 25th anniversary marking the brutal crushing of the Tiananmen Square protests. China's pro-Democracy activists gathered in Tokyo, commemorating 25 years after the crackdown calling for the world's pressure on Beijing. AFP PHOTO/Toru YAMANAKA (Photo credit should read TORU YAMANAKA/AFP/Getty Images)
A member of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China holds placards before he and others march to the central post office to mail a Christmas parcel to China's jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, in Hong Kong on December 10, 2012. Liu Xiaobo was sentenced to 11 years in jail in December 2009 for 'subversion' after co-authoring Charter 08, a bold petition calling for political reform in one-party Communist-ruled China. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
Members of the Hong Kong Alliance in Support of Patriotic Democratic Movements of China hold placards before they march to the central post office to mail a Christmas parcel to China's jailed Nobel Peace Prize laureate Liu Xiaobo, in Hong Kong on December 10, 2012. Liu Xiaobo was sentenced to 11 years in jail in December 2009 for 'subversion' after co-authoring Charter 08, a bold petition calling for political reform in one-party Communist-ruled China. AFP PHOTO / Philippe Lopez (Photo credit should read PHILIPPE LOPEZ/AFP/Getty Images)
A protester holds pictures of Chinese writer Mo Yan (L) and Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo (R) during a demonstration in front of the Chinese liaison offices in Hong Kong on October 13, 2012. China's Nobel Prize-winning writer Mo Yan won praise from supporters of the jailed dissident Liu Xiaobo after the officially tolerated writer called for his fellow laureate's freedom. AFP PHOTO / LAURENT FIEVET (Photo credit should read LAURENT FIEVET/AFP/GettyImages)
Protesters hold pictures of Chinese writer Mo Yan (L) and Chinese dissident Liu Xiaobo (R) during a demonstration in front of the Chinese liaison offices in Hong Kong on October 13, 2012. China's Nobel Prize-winning writer Mo Yan won praise from supporters of the jailed dissident Liu Xiaobo after the officially tolerated writer called for his fellow laureate's freedom. AFP PHOTO / LAURENT FIEVET (Photo credit should read LAURENT FIEVET/AFP/GettyImages)
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BEIJING (AP) - Jailed Chinese Nobel peace laureate Liu Xiaobo has told an overseas friend that he is relatively healthy but wants the world to pay more attention to other Chinese activists in a message that was smuggled out of jail.

"The aura around me is enough already. I hope the world can pay more attention to other victims who are not well known, or not known at all," said a message sent by Liu to dissident Liao Yiwu, who lives in exile in Germany.

Liao, who posted the message Thursday on Facebook, did not say how he received the message from Liu, who is serving an 11-year jail sentence for inciting state subversion, but Liu's friends have said the message is genuine.

While in prison, Liu was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 2010 for his calls for political reforms. Beijing condemned the award and put his wife, Liu Xia, under house arrest.

Liu Xia still can visit her husband in jail, although their meetings are under tight watch.

Liao said he received the message Tuesday through channels in China and that it was the first he had heard from Liu in more than six years.

"My eyes are suddenly moist," Liao said on Facebook.

In the message, Liu said he was doing well and had been reading and thinking.

"Through studies, I have become even more convinced that I have no personal enemies," Liu said.

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