Former Polish president admits CIA black site after years of denials

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Former Polish president admits CIA black site after years of denials
Ambassador James Woolsey, who was CIA Director from 1993 to 1995, insists the torture report should never have been released. (The National Academy of Sciences/Flickr)
UNITED STATES - DECEMBER 09: Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., Chairwoman of the Senate Intelligence Committee, talks with reporters after sharing a report on the CIA and it's torture methods, December 9, 2014. (Photo By Tom Williams/CQ Roll Call)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09: U.S. Senate Minority Leader Sen. Mitch McConnell (R-KY) (R), and Senate Minority Whip Sen. John Cornyn (R-TX) (L), listen as the Senate Republican speak to members of the media after the Senate Republican Policy Luncheon at the Capitol December 9, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. The Senate Republican leadership responded to a report on CIA's use of torture conducted by the Senate Intelligence Committee where were released today. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 9: Sen. Diane Feinstein(D-CA), makes her way through a crush of reporters toward the Senate floor to deliver her remarks on the CIA report on torture released this morning on December, 09, 2014 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Bill O'Leary/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - DECEMBER 09: U.S. Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid (D-NV) speaks to members of the media after the Senate Democratic Policy Luncheon at the Capitol December 9, 2014 on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC. Senator Reid responded to a report on CIA's use of torture conducted by the Senate Intelligence Committee where were released today. (Photo by Alex Wong/Getty Images)
Pakistani private security guards stand on duty outside the US consulate in Lahore on December 9, 2014. The US Senate will release a long-delayed report into the CIA's brutal interrogation of Al-Qaeda suspects after the 2001 attacks, as American embassies went on heightened alert amid fears of a backlash. AFP PHOTO / Arif ALI (Photo credit should read Arif Ali/AFP/Getty Images)
A lighthouse and old migrants boats on the ground of the marine museum, on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014 at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in this photo approved for release by the U.S. military. (Walter Michot/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
The original courtroom at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in this photo approved for release by the U.S. military. (Walter Michot/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
A display of the restraint chair that the Navy medics use to tube-feed hunger strikers on Tuesday, Nov. 4, 2014 at the U.S. Navy base at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba in this photo approved for release by the U.S. military. (Walter Michot/Miami Herald/TNS via Getty Images)
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By RYAN GORMAN

Poland has admitted hosting one of the secret CIA prisons referred to as "black sites."

Former Polish President Aleksander Kwasniewski admitted Tuesday to a Warsaw radio station, according to the Associated Press, that he authorized the prison but insisted torture was prohibited.

Kwasniewski's admission came in the hours after the Senate Intelligence Committee released a report on alleged terror suspect torture at the hands of CIA agents overseas.

The 600-page summary made public did not name the locations of the facilities.

The former Polish leader's admission came after years of denials despite several reports on the black site being in the country. Kwasniewski served as president from 1995 to 2005.

CIA agents are alleged to have tortured as many as eight terror suspects at the Polish facility, including Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the self-proclaimed 9/11 terror attack mastermind.

The Polish prison is believed to have been in operation from December 2002 until late 2003.

Kwasniewski's stunning about-face included an admission that the prison was also shuttered due to pressure from other high-ranking officials in the country.

"Poland took steps to end the activity at this site and the activity was stopped at some point," Kwasniewski told Radio TOK FM.

The former Soviet Block country is not specifically named in the report, but detainees and dates they were held are clear references to the Polish facility, when matched against previous reports.

The torture report instead mentions the black sites by color. Poland was designated blue, according to the Washington Post.

Kwasniewski also insisted he pressured former U.S. President George W. Bush to halt American intelligence activities during a visit to the White House.

The former Polish leader visited the U.S. in July 2002, according to the AP.

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