The world may be running out of chocolate

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The world may be running out of chocolate
Cacao beans from Boyaca, winner of the national cocoa contest 'Concurso Cacao de Oro' organized by Swiss-company and Proexport, are arranged for a photograph at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker does a test cut to check the quality of cacao beans from Boyaca, winner of the national cocoa contest 'Concurso Cacao de Oro' organized by Swiss-company and Proexport, at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Cacao beans from Boyaca, winner of the national cocoa contest 'Concurso Cacao de Oro' organized by Swiss-company and Proexport, await a quality inspection after being cut at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Cacao beans from Boyaca, winner of the national cocoa contest 'Concurso Cacao de Oro' organized by Swiss-company and Proexport, await a quality inspection after being cut at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Workers package chocolate for export to Japan at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Chocolate is poured into a mold after processing in a tempering machine at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker packages chocolate for export to Japan at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A worker removes chocolate from a mold before packaging it at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Chocolate awaits packaging after being removed from molds at the Cacao Hunters chocolate factory in Popayan, in the Cauca department of Colombia, on Monday, Oct. 6, 2014. Colombian cocoa growers have held talks with some of the world's top chocolate makers including Barry Callebaut AG and Ferrero SPA in a bid to replicate the success of the country's high-end coffee industry. Photographer: Mariana Greif Etchebehere/Bloomberg via Getty Images
A plantation worker uses a rake on a tray of cocoa beans left out to dry in the sun at the Fond Doux resort and plantation, on the grounds of a 19th century French colonial resort in Soufriere, Saint Lucia, on September 17, 2014. Across the Caribbean the cocoa industry, with roots tied to its colonial history, is being revitalized to help economies where the once dominant banana and sugar industries have all but been destroyed by free trade. On the island of Saint Lucia one can find chocolate-themed hotels, plantation tours, and even and annual Chocolate Festival to promote its cacao crop, which dates back to the 1700's. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A plantation worker pulls out a tray of cocoa beans to dry in the sun at the Fond Doux resort and plantation, on the grounds of a 19th century French colonial resort in Soufriere, Saint Lucia, on September 17, 2014. Across the Caribbean the cocoa industry, with roots tied to its colonial history, is being revitalized to help economies where the once dominant banana and sugar industries have all but been destroyed by free trade. On the island of Saint Lucia one can find chocolate-themed hotels, plantation tours, and even and annual Chocolate Festival to promote its cacao crop, which dates back to the 1700's. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
A ripened cocoa pod containing some thirty to forty cocoa beans inside, hangs from a cocoa tree ready for harvest at the Fond Doux resort and plantation, on the grounds of a 19th century French colonial resort in Soufriere, Saint Lucia, on September 17, 2014. Across the Caribbean the cocoa industry, with roots tied to its colonial history, is being revitalized to help economies where the once dominant banana and sugar industries have all but been destroyed by free trade. On the island of Saint Lucia one can find chocolate-themed hotels, plantation tours, and even and annual Chocolate Festival to promote its cacao crop, which dates back to the 1700's. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Tiny cocoa pods which have just started growing will reach a larger size in about a month containing some thirty to forty cocoa beans inside are seen hanging from a cocoa tree at the Fond Doux resort and plantation, on the grounds of a 19th century French colonial resort in Soufriere, Saint Lucia, on September 17, 2014. Across the Caribbean the cocoa industry, with roots tied to its colonial history, is being revitalized to help economies where the once dominant banana and sugar industries have all but been destroyed by free trade. On the island of Saint Lucia one can find chocolate-themed hotels, plantation tours, and even and annual Chocolate Festival to promote its cacao crop, which dates back to the 1700's. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Cocoa pods are displayed at the Fond Doux resort and plantation on the grounds of a 19th century French colonial resort in Soufriere, Saint Lucia, on September 17, 2014. Across the Caribbean the cocoa industry, with roots tied to its colonial history, is being revitalized to help economies where the once dominant banana and sugar industries have all but been destroyed by free trade. On the island of Saint Lucia one can find chocolate-themed hotels, plantation tours, and even and annual Chocolate Festival to promote its cacao crop, which dates back to the 1700's. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
Cocoa beans, left to dry for up to a month, are seen at the Fond Doux resort and plantation, on the grounds of a 19th century French colonial resort in Soufriere, Saint Lucia, on September 17, 2014. Across the Caribbean the cocoa industry, with roots tied to its colonial history, is being revitalized to help economies where the once dominant banana and sugar industries have all but been destroyed by free trade. On the island of Saint Lucia one can find chocolate-themed hotels, plantation tours, and even and annual Chocolate Festival to promote its cacao crop, which dates back to the 1700's. AFP PHOTO / Frederic J. BROWN (Photo credit should read FREDERIC J. BROWN/AFP/Getty Images)
TOGO - MARCH 24: Fruit of the cacao tree, Togo. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
GHANA - MARCH 24: Processing and drying cocoa beans, near Kumasi, Ghana. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY YANA MARULL Cacao shoots are watered by a sprinkler in a farm in Sao Felix do Xingu, Para state, northern Brazil, on August 7, 2013. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
Banana shoots are watered by a sprinkler in a farm in Sao Felix do Xingu, Para state, northern Brazil, on August 7, 2013. AFP PHOTO / YASUYOSHI CHIBA (Photo credit should read YASUYOSHI CHIBA/AFP/Getty Images)
MONDONI, CAMEROON - OCTOBER 30: Cocoa pods at a cocoa plantation on October 30, 2012 in Mondoni, Cameroon. (Photo by Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images)
MONDONI, CAMEROON - OCTOBER 30: A cocoa tree bearing cocoa pods on October 30, 2012 in Mondoni, Cameroon. (Photo by Thomas Imo/Photothek via Getty Images)
A girl spreads cacao beans to dry in Pichari, Peru on June 14, 2012. AFP PHOTO/HUGO NED (Photo credit should read Hugo NED/AFP/GettyImages)
Workers extract beans from cacao pods in Mecicilandia, along the Trans-Amazon highway on May 31, 2012. A chocolate factory located along the Trans-Amazon highway in Medicilandia works as a sweet antidote to deforestation, one of the major issues of the UN Conference Rio+20 that begins next week in Brazil. 'The Trans-Amazon highway was known for decades as an area of environmental crime, we have an image of destruction of the Amazon that we want change with this initiative,' says Ademir Venturim, president of the cooperative of 40 small producers who work at the chocolate factory. AFP PHOTO / Evaristo SA (Photo credit should read EVARISTO SA/AFP/GettyImages)
A girl spreads cacao beans to dry in Pichari, Peru on June 14, 2012. AFP PHOTO/HUGO NED (Photo credit should read Hugo NED/AFP/GettyImages)
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(THE HUFFINGTON POST) -- Mars, Inc. and Barry Callebaut, the world's biggest chocolate make said the world is heading toward a not-so-sweet deficit. Simply put: we're eating too much chocolate.

Bloomberg reports that from 1993 to 2007, the price of cocoa averaged about $1,400 a ton; the past six years had an average of little more than $2,700 - an 87 percent increase.

We're Running Out Of Chocolate

The lack of supply is reportedly due to drought, disease, higher demand of more-productive crops like corn, and rising popularity of dark chocolate - which calls for more cocoa, according to Bloomberg.

By 2020, the demand for chocolate is expected to outstrip supply by 1 million tons.

As this deficit grows, we can expect prices of our beloved candy to rise and we will also see more ingredients, like nuts and nougats, vanilla and other fillers.

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