CBS journalist Lara Logan quarantined over Ebola fears after '60 Minutes' report from Liberia

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CBS journalist Lara Logan quarantined over Ebola fears after '60 Minutes' report from Liberia
NEW YORK - JUNE 13: Lara Logan, Correspondent for 60 Minutes, on the CBS Television Network. (Photo by John Paul Filo/CBS via Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - APRIL 29: Lara Logan (L) talks with David Remnick, editor of The New Yorker, and Esther Fein at the New Yorker White House Correspondents' dinner pre-party at The W Hotel, rooftop on April 29, 2011 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Paul Morigi/Getty Images for The New Yorker)
NEW YORK - MAY 28: Journalist Lara Logan attends the 33rd Annual American Women In Radio & Television Gracie Allen Awards at the Marriott Marquis on May 28, 2008 in New York City. (Photo by Jemal Countess/WireImage)
THE TONIGHT SHOW WITH JAY LENO -- Episode 3457 -- Pictured: (l-r) Lara Logan of CBS News during an interview with host Jay Leno on October 15, 2007 -- Photo by: Margaret Norton/NBCU Photo Bank
Giunta 60 Minutes interview Oct. 1, 2010
NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 1: Lara Logan, chief foreign affairs correspondent for CBS News attends the 33rd annual News & Documentary Emmy awards at Frederick P. Rose Hall, Jazz at Lincoln Center on October 1, 2012 in New York City. (Photo by Marc Bryan-Brown/WireImage)
NEW YORK - MAY 28: (LtoR) Mary Bennett, actress Kelly Rutherford and TV personality Lara Logan attend the 33rd Annual American Women In Radio & Television Gracie Allen Awards at the Marriott Marquis on May 28, 2008 in New York City. (Photo by Larry Busacca/WireImage)
Lara Logan (Photo by L. Busacca/WireImage for AWRT)
BAGHDAD, IRAQ - NOVEMBER 17: Journalist Lara Logan of CBS News appears in Camp Victory in Baghdad, Iraq November 17, 2006. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
BAGHDAD, IRAQ - NOVEMBER 17: Journalist Lara Logan of CBS News questions U.S. Soldiers in Camp Victory in Baghdad, Iraq November 17, 2006. (Photo by Chris Hondros/Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - MARCH 03: CBS news anchor Bob Schieffer (left) with correspondents Lara Logan and Mark Strassberg at CBS News offices on W. 57th St. (Photo by David Handschuh/NY Daily News Archive via Getty Images)
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By RYAN GORMAN

CBS reporter Lara Logan has been quarantined after filming a "60 Minutes" report from Ebola-ravaged Liberia.

Logan has voluntarily isolated herself for 21-days in a South Africa hotel room following production of the report that aired Sunday, she told CBS News.

She will be free to go as of this Friday, according to a web-only segment for "60 Minutes Overtime."

The report was one of only a handful Logan has filed since a taking a leave of absence from the iconic newsmagazine following the admission of several errors last fall in a report on the Benghazi scandal.

Logan and her crew have spent the past few weeks in isolation but not shown any symptoms of the potentially deadly virus, she explained. She detailed conditions around the country and at an American clinic meant to help treat Ebola patients

"One thing that strikes you when you arrive in the country is that the first thing you see is Liberian workers in the airport who are wearing face masks," she recalled. "Some of them wearing aprons.

"Before you can enter the terminal building, you have to wash your hands with chlorine."

Lara Logan On Self-Quarantine

Logan also spoke of the massive effort undertaken by Geoff Maberly, a member of the production crew, to keep the "60 Minutes" staff Ebola-free.

Geoff just watched us every minute of the day," Logan said. "[He] sprayed us with chlorine and disinfected everything: the drivers, the cars, the luggage - every time you got out, came out of somewhere."

Of the American-run clinic set up by International Medic Corps, Logan explained why she took the dangerous trip.

"We thought that the Americans who are working there -- who are with these people every day, who have chosen to be there -- could help bring to life the suffering of the Liberians through their own experiences," said the reporter.

Logan has reported mostly from war-torn regions in the Middle East during her extensive career on CBS. She compared Liberia to a war zone.

"You have to keep it together because that's your job, and you can't be here if you can't do that," she said. "But it's so heartbreaking. It's really been hard on all of us."

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Liberia Ebola - vaccine - last updated 7/1/2015
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CBS journalist Lara Logan quarantined over Ebola fears after '60 Minutes' report from Liberia
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse takes a blood sample from Emmanuel Lansana, 43, the first person to take part in the Ebola vaccine study being conducted at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse speaks with a volunteer for the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
People walk near a sign calling for volunteers for an Ebola vaccine study at Redemption Hospital in New Kru Town, a suburb of Monrovia, on February 2, 2015. The first large-scale trials of two Ebola vaccines were due to begin in Liberia on February 2, the partnership conducting the research said. The vaccines contain harmless fragments of the virus that trigger an immune response, according to the Partnership for Research on Ebola Vaccines in Liberia (PREVAIL), a collaboration between the United States and Liberia. AFP PHOTO / ZOOM DOSSO (Photo credit should read ZOOM DOSSO/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Mothers bring their sick children for treatment at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Life is slowly returning to normal for many Liberians, and most hospitals and clinics have re-opened as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: People await treatment in the outpatient lounge of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: People await outpatient treatment at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Health workers in protective clothing await patients in the outpatient lounge of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A placard with information on identifying Ebola symptoms lies in the outpatient waiting room of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A doctor displays Ebola vaccines to be given in the vaccine trials which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Emmanuel Lansana, 43, takes part in a briefing before becoming the first person to be injected in the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Health workers in protective clothing speak with new arrivals in the outpatient waiting room of Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Most hospitals and clinics have re-opened, as the Ebola epidemic wanes. The virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Dr. Mike Montello, research director at the U.S. National Institutes of Health, prepares the first batch of Ebola vaccines to be given in the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse takes a blood sample from Emmanuel Lansana, 43, the first person to take part in the Ebola vaccine study being conducted at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse administers an injection to Emmanuel Lansana, 43, the first person to take part in the Ebola vaccine trials being conducted at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana was the first of 12 people given injections, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: Emmanuel Lansana, 43, takes part in a briefing before becoming the first person to be injected in the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Lansana, a physician's assistant, was the first of 12 people given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A Liberian pharmacist prepares an Ebola vaccine to be given in the vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA - FEBRUARY 02: A nurse speaks with a volunteer for the Ebola vaccine trials, which were launched at Redemption Hospital, formerly an Ebola holding center, on February 2, 2015 in Monrovia, Liberia. Twelve people were given injections on the first day, out of a planned 27,000 people in the Monrovia area. The clinical research study is being conducted jointly by the U.S. National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Liberian Ministry of Health. The Ebola epidemic virus has killed at least 3,700 people in Liberia alone, the most of any country, and nearly 9,000 across in West Africa. (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images)
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Related links:
Scientists discover 'stupid virus'
Liberia village becomes a new Ebola epicenter
Ebola nurse to remain a voice against quarantines
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