Coroner: Robin Williams had no illegal drugs or alcohol in his system at death

New Details Have Emerged Surrounding Robin Williams' Death
New Details Have Emerged Surrounding Robin Williams' Death


By RYAN GORMAN

Actor and comedian Robin Williams was sober when he committed suicide, according to a newly released coroner's report.

Williams' sudden death August 11 shocked the world, and many immediately speculated he had relapsed into his much-publicized addictions, but authorities say no illegal drugs or alcohol were present in his body at the time of his death.

Prescription drugs were in his system in "therapeutic concentrations," the coroner said, according to CNN. His death was also formally ruled a suicide.

The acclaimed actor openly suffered from depression and anxiety and battled addictions to both drugs and alcohol.

He was also later revealed by his grieving widow Susan Schneider to have had early-stage Parkinson's disease.

Williams was found dead in his home by a friend. Investigators believe he was dead for at least few hours before being discovered.

He is believed by the coroner to have committed suicide by hanging himself with a belt from a bedroom door. Superficial cuts to his wrists believed to have been made with a pocket knife found nearby were also noted in the report.

Autopsy results were originally expected to be released September 20, then delayed to November 3 and finally released Friday.

Toxicology results normally take no more than six weeks to be released.

The 63-year-old Academy Award winner was a star of both television and movies.

His big break came in 1978 with a starring role in the television series "Mork & Mindy."

Williams' first starring role in a movie was in 1980's "Popeye."

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