Quarantined Ebola nurse goes outside; police watch

Don't Bully Me: Maine Nurse

FORT KENT, Maine (AP) -- Practically daring Maine health authorities to go to court to have her confined, nurse Kaci Hickox went out on a bike ride Thursday in defiance of the state's voluntary quarantine for medical workers who have treated Ebola patients.

It was the second time in two days that she left her home in remote northern Maine, along the Canadian border. On Wednesday evening, Hickox came out and briefly spoke to reporters, even shaking a hand that was offered to her.

State officials planned to go to court Thursday to have her confined to her home against her will in what is shaping up as the nation's biggest test case yet in the struggle to balance public health and fear of Ebola against personal freedom.

Hickox, 33, told reporters that she hoped for a compromise with health officials, but her actions indicated she had no intention of remaining in isolation for the remainder of the 21-day incubation period for Ebola that ends on Nov. 10.

"I really hope that we can work things out amicably and continue to negotiate," she said as she and her boyfriend rode on a dirt path in this town of 4,300 people.

An unmarked state police cruiser followed Hickox on her hour-long bike ride, but police could not take action to detain her without a court order signed by a judge.

Hickox has said that quarantine is a violation of her rights and that she is no threat to others because she has no symptoms.

Around midday, Gov. Paul LePage said the state was willing to agree to arrangements that would have allowed Hickox to go for walks, runs and bicycle rides while preventing her from going into public places or coming within 3 feet of others.

But LePage said negotiations with Hickox and her lawyers broke down, and he announced that he intended to exercise his full authority to address threats to the public health.

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Kaci Hickox Ebola nurse - updated 11/2
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Quarantined Ebola nurse goes outside; police watch
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT , ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT , ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
Photo of Kaci Hickox, the nurse quarantined at a New Jersey hospital because she had contact with Ebola patients in West Africa, in her isolation unit at a Newark, New Jersey hospital. She said the process of keeping her isolated is "inhumane." The photo was released by her attorney, Norman Siegel. 
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: NBC affiliate network producer Nick Bogert, left, video photojournalist Joel Coblenz, center, and audio technician Paul Green knock on the home of Ted Wilbur, where Kaci Hickox returned Tuesday evening in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Members of the media line up outside Ted Wilbur's home, where Kaci Hickox returned on Tuesday night, in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: A CDC employee is escorted by the Maine State Police to the home of Ted Wilbur, where Kaci Hickox is staying in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. Hickox is being monitored for Ebola symptoms, and the employee was there to take Hickox's temperature. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: The home of Ted Wilbur, the boyfriend of Kaci Hickox, who returned Tuesday evening to Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT , ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: An unmarked Maine State Police Trooper sits outside the home of Ted Wilbur, where Kaci Hickox returned Tuesday evening in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. A uniformed officer said the Maine State Police was there to work with the CDC, to watch for safety and movement at the home. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Ted Wilbur greets a passing car as he waits for the CDC to take his girlfriend, Kaci Hickox's temperature, in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. Hickox is required to have her temperature monitored to determine whether she is displaying symptoms of Ebola. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: A CDC employee makes the turn into Ted Wilbur's home while a Maine State police officer walks to meet and escort her inside to Kaci Hickox in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
DETAILS: New Jersey releasing nurse quarantined in #Ebola scare: http://t.co/8DCnKWoySf #abc15 http://t.co/r7lSNZuMgh
Quarantined, asymptomatic nurse in NJ sent CNN these photos of her current living quarters. #Ebola http://t.co/ieaZ7DLcKq
Gov says state police now parked outside #kacihickox Fort Kent home "both for her protection & health of community." http://t.co/BVE6iTK2DD
Aerial view of Newark Airport, New Jersey, New York
US nurse sues after being forced into quarantine in New Jersey http://t.co/FgQUUKKmca http://t.co/RoPcl5tFiR
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
FORT KENT, ME - OCTOBER 29: Kaci Hickox and boyfriend Ted Wilbur take questions from the press regarding the state of Maine's quarantine policy outside Wilbur's home in Fort Kent, ME on Wednesday, October 29, 2014. 'I remain in good spirits and I'm thankful to be home with my partner Ted. I went into public health because I believe that good science and compassion can make a difference in peoples' lives. That is exactly why I went to Sierra leone to fight Ebola. It is not my intention to put anyone at risk in this community. We have been in negotiations all day with the state of Maine, and tried to resolve this amicably, but they will not allow me to leave my house and have any interaction with the public even though I'm completely healthy and symptom free.' Hickox said she's been told the attorney general intends to file legal action, and if that occurs, she will fight those legal actions. (Photo by Whitney Hayward/Portland Press Herald via Getty Images)
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Hickox stepped into the media glare when she returned from treating Ebola patients in Sierra Leone to become subject to a mandatory quarantine in New Jersey. After being released from a hospital there, she returned to this small town, where she was placed under what Maine authorities called a voluntary quarantine.

She said she is following the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommendation of daily monitoring for fever and other signs of the disease.

"I'm not willing to stand here and let my civil rights be violated when it's not science-based," she said Wednesday evening.

States have broad authority under long-established law to quarantine people to prevent the spread of disease. But legal experts said there are differences here that could work in Hickox's favor in court: People infected with Ebola are not contagious until they have symptoms, and the virus is not spread through casual contact.

In Hickox's case, she has tested negative for Ebola so far. But it can take days for the virus to reach detectable levels.

In other developments:

- Ebola fears infected a medical conference on the subject. Louisiana state health officials told thousands of doctors planning to attend a tropical-diseases meeting this weekend in New Orleans to stay away if they have been to certain African countries or have had contact with an Ebola patient in the last 21 days.

- Liberia is making some progress in containing the outbreak, while Sierra Leone is "in a crisis situation which is going to get worse," the top anti-Ebola officials in the two countries said.

- The World Bank announced it will give an additional $100 million to help bring in more foreign health workers. That raises the money it has given to the fight to $500 million.

Some states like Maine are going above and beyond the CDC guidelines to require quarantines. So is the U.S military.

President Barack Obama, the nation's top infectious-disease expert and humanitarian groups have warned that overly restrictive measures could cripple the fight against the disease at its source by discouraging volunteers like Hickox from going to West Africa, where the outbreak has sickened more than 13,000 people and killed nearly 5,000 of them.

"These kinds of restrictions could dissuade hundreds, if not thousands, of skilled volunteers from helping stop Ebola's spread, which is in the national interest of every one of our countries," Samantha Power, U.S. ambassador to the United Nations, said Thursday in Brussels.

She added: "The volunteers are heroes to the people they help, and they are heroes to our own countries. They should be treated like heroes when they return."

In Maine, state law allows a judge to confine someone if health officials demonstrate "a clear and immediate public health threat."

If a judge grants the request, Hickox will appeal on constitutional grounds, said Norman Siegel, one of her attorneys.

Siegel said the nurse hopes her fight against the quarantine will help bring an end to misinformation about how Ebola is spread.

"She wants to have her voice in the debate about how America handles the Ebola crisis. She has an important voice and perspective," he said.

Word spread quickly around the town about Hickox.

Priscilla Staples said that some are fearful of Hickox's presence, but Hickox "has done nothing wrong, and she has every right in the world to go for a bike ride."

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