Just how hot is the lava coming from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano?

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How Hot Is Lava?

Lava from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano continues to creep toward the main road in Pahoa, a town with around 950 residents. Since it's only traveling about 5-10 yards an hour, residents have had time to pack up and leave their homes behind.

If you've seen the frightening flow, you may have wondered just how hot the lava is. 'Wake Up With Al' has given us some comparisons.

Lava flowing from the Kilauea volcano is about 2,000 degrees Fahrenheit. According to the United States Geological Survey, lava on the cooler side can flow at the same temperature as the interior of a pizza oven. That's around 570 degrees -- although some pizza ovens can get as high as 900 degrees.

The dark red lava often seen crawling across Hawaii measures in at about 895 degrees Fahrenheit.

The magma and other matters that spewed out of Mount St. Helen's was also about 895 degrees, but the material exploded out of the top was going at about 100 miles per hour.

According to CNN, a USGS geologist said the lava flow from Kilauea could continue for 30 years.

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Hawaii Volcano Kilauea
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Just how hot is the lava coming from Hawaii's Kilauea volcano?
PAHOA, HAWAII - OCTOBER 28: In this handout provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), A portion of the front of the June 27th lava flow pushes through a fence marking a property boundary on October 28, 2014 in Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted ground and air observations of the lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano and determined that it was 510 meters (560 yards) upslope from Pa-hoa Village Road and the flow width was about 50 meters (55 yards) at the leading edge. Molten rock from the flow is inching its way towards homes in the town of Pahoa on Hawaii's Big Island where close to a thousand people live. (Photo by USGS via Getty Images)
PAHOA, HAWAII - OCTOBER 28: In this handout provided by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), A portion of the front of the June 27th lava flow pushes through a fence marking a property boundary on October 28, 2014 in Pahoa, Hawaii. Scientists of the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory conducted ground and air observations of the lava flow from the Kilauea Volcano and determined that it was 510 meters (560 yards) upslope from Pa-hoa Village Road and the flow width was about 50 meters (55 yards) at the leading edge. Molten rock from the flow is inching its way towards homes in the town of Pahoa on Hawaii's Big Island where close to a thousand people live. (Photo by USGS via Getty Images)
Kilauea volcano, Hawaii. Cool to see what earth must have been once. http://t.co/p2SQ2XuEJE
Paddling near to a volcano. The Kilauea is throwing lava into the ocean since 1983. Photo by AleSocci http://t.co/jrVKdEIthm
#Hawaii mayor declares state of emergency as lava from #Kilauea volcano flows towards homes http://t.co/kkBSBPG2Bw http://t.co/qTsXIPhOKj
Lava flowing from Hawaii volcano http://t.co/ie6XNHobao http://t.co/wcMWCazvjJ
Lava is crawling inch-by-inch towards a Hawaii rural community, but there's no evacuation yet. http://t.co/s4zfLppubS http://t.co/fEe6em3sNf
BIG ISLAND, HAWAII - APRIL 6. EXCLUSIVE: Pahoehoe lava is entering the sea during the day from Kilauea volcano on April, 6, 2005 in Hawaii. German electrical engineer Martin Rietze specialises in astronomical and meteorological equipment, his work takes him to strange environments such as the Arctic and volcanos around the world. As a lover of photography Martin always documents his trip with pictures and noticed how alien landscapes can look despite being here on earth. Martin has produced a stunning set of images entitled Alien Landscapes on Planet Earth which he hopes one day will form a book. (Photo by Martin Rietze / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
BIG ISLAND, HAWAII - APRIL 6. EXCLUSIVE: Pahoehoe lava is entering the sea at dawn time from Kilauea volcano on April, 6, 2005 in Hawaii. German electrical engineer Martin Rietze specialises in astronomical and meteorological equipment, his work takes him to strange environments such as the Arctic and volcanos around the world. As a lover of photography Martin always documents his trip with pictures and noticed how alien landscapes can look despite being here on earth. Martin has produced a stunning set of images entitled Alien Landscapes on Planet Earth which he hopes one day will form a book. (Photo by Martin Rietze / Barcroft Media / Getty Images)
UNITED STATES - CIRCA 2003: Eruption of Kilauea Volcano, Hawaii Volcanoes National Park (UNESCO World Heritage List, 1987), Island of Hawaii, Hawaii, United States of America. (Photo by DeAgostini/Getty Images)
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