Cruise ship with monitored health worker returns

39 PHOTOS
Ebola in America
See Gallery
Cruise ship with monitored health worker returns
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 15: Emergency vehicles escort an ambulance on the tarmac at Love Field Airport October 15, 2014. The ambulance had reportedly delivered Amber Vinson, a health care worker, to an air ambulance. According to reports, Vinson, had contracted the Ebola virus and had taken a commercial Frontier Airlines flight from Cleveland, Ohio to Dallas, Texas, a day before become symptomatic. (Photo by Stewart F. House/Getty Images)
Amber Joy Vinson, 2nd Dallas nurse with Ebola, traveled to Ohio to visit family, plan wedding http://t.co/AfQQEcnh4h http://t.co/YP5oI0j9Iv
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 17: Paige Victoria, 23, of Cleveland, Ohio, and Jeff Hulbert of Annapolis, Maryland, (obscured in back) hold up signs in front of the White House on October 17, 2014 in Washington, D.C. Hulbert is protesting the entry of Ebola into the country through air travel. 'There should be a temporary travel ban on visitors from infected regions until medical infrastructure can get up to speed,' said Hulbert. (Photo by Allison Shelley/Getty Images)
Jeff Hulbert from Annapolis, Maryland, dressed in a protective suit and mask holds a poster demanding for a halt of all flights from West Africa,as he protests outside the White House in Washington, DC on October 16, 2014. Top US health officials faced a grilling Thursday by lawmakers infuriated over the nation's fumbling response to the Ebola outbreak, as the Obama administration scrambles to contain the disease's spread. Centers for Disease Control (CDC) director Thomas Frieden has become the most prominent target of the criticism, which has mounted as it emerged that a second Texas health care worker infected with the deadly disease was allowed to board a commercial flight despite reporting a low-grade fever. AFP PHOTO/MLADEN ANTONOV (Photo credit should read MLADEN ANTONOV/AFP/Getty Images)
Twilette Miller, a nurse arriving from Dayton, Ohio, and concerned about Ebola reports, wears a precautionary surgical mask at Dulles International Airport October 16, 2014, in Sterling, Virginia, outside Washington, DC. Some schools in Ohio and Texas closed Thursday amid fears that students or staff had been exposed to a nurse who had Ebola infection during an airline flight. The US Centers for Disease Control has reached out to 132 people who were on the same October 13 flight as Amber Vinson, but said there was an extremely low risk that anyone was infected. AFP PHOTO/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 15: An air ambulance carrying Amber Vinson takes off from Love Field Airport October 15, 2014. According to reports, Vinson, a healthcare worker, had contracted the Ebola virus and had taken a commercial Frontier Airlines flight from Cleveland, Ohio to Dallas, Texas, a day before become symptomatic. (Photo by Stewart F. House/Getty Images)
WASHINGTON, DC - OCTOBER 16: White House Press Secretary Josh Earnest takes questions from the media during his daily briefing in the Brady Briefing Room, October 16, 2014 in Washington, DC. Secretary Earnest spoke about the two health care workers who were infected with the Ebola virus in Texas. (Photo by Mark Wilson/Getty Images)
This 2010 photo provided by tcu360.com, the yearbook of Texas Christian University, shows Nina Pham, 26, who became the first person to contract the disease within the United States. Records show that Pham and other health care workers wore protective gear, including gowns, gloves, masks and face shields and sometimes full-body suits when caring for Thomas Eric Duncan. (AP Photo/Courtesy of tcu360.com)

Nina Pham (Instagram)

DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A man dressed in protective hazmat clothing walks towards an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
Twilette Miller, a nurse arriving from Dayton, Ohio, and concerned about Ebola reports, wears a precautionary surgical mask at Dulles International Airport October 16, 2014, in Sterling, Virginia, outside Washington, DC. Some schools in Ohio and Texas closed Thursday amid fears that students or staff had been exposed to a nurse who had Ebola infection during an airline flight. The US Centers for Disease Control has reached out to 132 people who were on the same October 13 flight as Amber Vinson, but said there was an extremely low risk that anyone was infected. AFP PHOTO/Paul J. Richards (Photo credit should read PAUL J. RICHARDS/AFP/Getty Images)
Passengers at Frontier gate at Hopkins now wearing masks http://t.co/kBn0hhZhQZ
This is Amber Vinson, the #ebola patient that flew from #CLE to #Texas after visiting #Akron http://t.co/wBoZM9Hvr1 http://t.co/RGSvcA6l3Q
Family confirms, #Dallas nurse Nina Pham is 2nd patient with #Ebola... #PrayersforNina http://t.co/dTXi5SPZVW http://t.co/u4slPTn6US
#NinaPham identified as Dallas nurse with #Ebola http://t.co/3p3AFlxp42 http://t.co/L4Ho8zSHuM
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Workers with hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys prepare a tarp to block the view of media as they prepare to enter an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A man dressed in protective hazmat clothing leaves after treating the front porch and sidewalk of an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: No trespassing signs and warning tape mark the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Dallas police setup a barrier after a hazmat vehicle entered the alley behind the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A man dressed in protective hazmat clothing walks towards an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A Dallas police officer sets up a barrier after a hazmat vehicle entered the alley behind the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A man dressed in protective hazmat clothing treats the front porch of an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Two workers with hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys stand in the alley behind an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A man dressed in protective hazmat clothing treats the sidewalk in front of an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A worker with hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys hangs a tarp blocking view of the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Brad Smith with the hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys talks with the media outside of an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: G.C. Williford, Battalion Chief for the Dallas Fire Department, talks with fire department personell outside an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Police officers stand near a barrel containing waste material (L) that was removed from the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Police officers stand outside an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Brad Smith with the hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys talks with the media outside of an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A Dallas police officer responds to media questions as hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys begins setup at the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Brad Smith (C) with hazmat company CG Environmental Cleaning Guys directs an employee outside of the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Volunteers pass out flyers for the Dallas County Health and Human Services department near an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A barrel containing waste material that was removed from the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides sits on the lawn on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: G.C. Williford, Battalion Chief for the Dallas Fire Department, enters an apartment where a second person has been diagnosed with the Ebola virus on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A barrel containing waste material that was removed from the apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides stis on the lawn on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A woman passes out flyers for the Dallas County Health and Human Services department near an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: Volunteers pass out flyers for the Dallas County Health and Human Services department near an apartment where a second person diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
DALLAS, TX - OCTOBER 12: A barrel labeled with biohazardous waste sits in front of an apartment where a second person has diagnosed with the Ebola virus resides on October 12, 2014 in Dallas, Texas. A female nurse working at Texas Heath Presbyterian Hospital, the same facility that treated Thomas Eric Duncan, has tested positive for the virus. (Photo by Mike Stone/Getty Images)
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE

GALVESTON, Texas (AP) - A cruise ship carrying a Dallas health care worker who was being monitored for Ebola returned to port Sunday after an eventful seven-day trip in which passengers had their vacations briefly disrupted with an infectious disease scare.

A lab supervisor who handled a specimen from a Liberian man who died from Ebola in Dallas showed no symptoms during the cruise but self-quarantined out of caution. Carnival Cruise Lines told passengers the unidentified woman was tested for Ebola but the results were negative.

Vicky Rey, vice president of guest care for Carnival Cruise Lines, said the woman and her husband drove themselves home after arriving in Galveston early Sunday, but offered no further details.

The Ebola scare added some drama to the trip for the hundreds of passengers on the ship.

They learned through a public address system announcement that one of the passengers was being monitored for Ebola. They watched developments about the Ebola outbreak and their ship on the news. The boat was not allowed to dock in Cozumel, depriving passengers of one of the top port destinations. Travelers snapped pictures of a Coast Guard helicopter as it landed to get a blood sample from the passenger.

"We weren't worried. We ended up just hanging out and enjoying the rest of the trip," said Meredith Brooks, a Houston banker who was on her honeymoon during the cruise.

State Department spokeswoman Jen Psaki said that when the woman left the U.S. on the cruise ship from Galveston, Texas, on Oct. 12 health officials were requiring only self-monitoring. Officials stepped up their response while the cruise was underway and two nurses were diagnosed with Ebola.

Carnival Cruise Lines said in a statement that the woman was "not deemed to be a risk to any guests or crew."

"We are in close contact with the CDC, and at this time it has been determined that the appropriate course of action is to simply keep the guest in isolation on board," the statement said, referring to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention.

Petty Officer Andy Kendrick told The Associated Press that a Coast Guard crew flew in a helicopter Saturday to meet the Carnival Magic and retrieved a blood sample from the woman. He said the blood sample was taken to a state lab in Austin for processing.

The ship was refused clearance to dock in Cozumel, Mexico on Friday, a day after Belize refused to let the passenger leave the vessel. There were no restrictions placed on other passengers aboard the ship, officials said.

Passenger James Dinkley of Thelma, Texas, took the cruise to celebrate his one-year wedding anniversary with his wife. He said there was some initial confusion and agitation after they learned of the situation, were delayed in Belize for several hours and had the Cozumel visit cancelled. But he said the cruise line kept everyone informed with regular updates after that.

"There was a lot of confusion, especially when they canceled our Cozumel day," he said.

Carnival gave passengers credit for the missed Cozumel leg.

Read Full Story