Sick journalist to get blood from Ebola survivor

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Obama/Kent Brantley Ebola- 9/17/2014
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Sick journalist to get blood from Ebola survivor
A health worker, wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE), enters a decontamination airlock on September 7, 2014 at Elwa hospital in Monrovia, which is run by the non-governmental French organization Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders -- MSF). US President Barack Obama said in an interview aired on September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but warned it would be months before the epidemic slowed. The tropical virus, transmitted through contact with infected bodily fluids, has killed 2,100 people in four countries since the start of the year -- more than half of them in Liberia. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A medical worker wearing Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) gestures beside a woman inside the high-risk area of the Elwa hospital runned by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders), where are being treated Ebola patients, on September 7, 2014 in Monrovia. President Barack Obama said in an interview aired September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but said it would be months before the epidemic slows. The death toll from the Ebola epidemic -- which is spreading across West Africa, with Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone the worst hit -- has topped 2,000, of nearly 4,000 people who have been infected, according to the World Health Organization. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
French nurse Lucie Perardel from Grenoble puts on Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) as she prepares before leaving for a high-risk area of the Elwa hospital runned by Medecins Sans Frontieres (Doctors without Borders), on September 7, 2014 in Monrovia. President Barack Obama said in an interview aired September 7 the US military would help in the fight against fast-spreading Ebola in Africa, but said it would be months before the epidemic slows. The death toll from the Ebola epidemic -- which is spreading across West Africa, with Liberia, Guinea, Sierra Leone the worst hit -- has topped 2,000, of nearly 4,000 people who have been infected, according to the World Health Organization. AFP PHOTO / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)
A member of the cleaning staff cleans and desinfects the site on August 14, 2014 in Biankouma during a simulation operation organized by the Ivory Coast Health Ministry to train medical staff in the west of the country to treat potential patients with Ebola. US President Barack Obama called his counterparts in Liberia and Sierra Leone on August 14 to discuss the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the White House said. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
A nurse leaves an isolation room after checking a man on August 14, 2014 at the district hospital of Biankouma, during a simulation operation organized by the Ivory Coast Health Ministry to train medical staff to treat potential patients with Ebola. US President Barack Obama called his counterparts in Liberia and Sierra Leone on August 14 to discuss the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the White House said. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
Strechers carry a man on a stretcher in an isolation room on August 14, 2014 at the district hospital of Biankouma, during a simulation operation organized by the Ivory Coast Health Ministry to train medical staff to deal with potential patients with Ebola. US President Barack Obama called his counterparts in Liberia and Sierra Leone on August 14 to discuss the Ebola outbreak in West Africa, the White House said. AFP PHOTO / ISSOUF SANOGO (Photo credit should read ISSOUF SANOGO/AFP/Getty Images)
MONROVIA, LIBERIA-SEPTEMBER 16: People rush to line up at the Ministry of Health and Social Welfare seeking work from the anticipated Ebola related jobs that will be coming to Liberia on Tuesday September 16, 2014 in Monrovia, Liberia. Since the outbreak of Ebola and a subsequent curfew people have not been able to work. President Obama's announcement of help has given some people hope, at least for pending jobs to fight Ebola. (Photo by Michel du Cille/The Washington Post via Getty Images)
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OMAHA, Neb. (AP) - The first American flown back to the U.S. for treatment of Ebola this summer has donated blood to the most recent one to return from West Africa with the disease.

The Nebraska Medical Center said Wednesday that it called Dr. Kent Brantly on Tuesday to tell him his blood type matches that of Ashoka Mukpo (ah-SHOH'-kuh MUK'-poh), a freelance video journalist who arrived at the medical center Monday.

The hospital says Brantly was driving through Kansas City, Mo., and was able to give blood locally that was flown to Omaha. It says Mukpo will receive the transfusion Wednesday.

Such transfusions are believed to help Ebola patients because a survivor's blood contains antibodies to fight the disease.

Brantly also donated blood to the first Ebola patient treated at the Nebraska hospital.
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