Dust devil touches down in Brooklyn park

Dust Devil Touches Down in Brooklyn Park

A dust devil descended upon Brooklyn's McCarren Park on August 10, surprising local residents who were out enjoying the sunshine. A few onlookers ran toward the small twister that touched down in Williamsburg, a neighborhood known for its "hipsters." Michael Gambale, who captured this video, cautioned, "No, don't go in the middle!"

According to the official definition of a dust devil from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA), it's a "small, rapidly rotating wind that is made visible by the dust, dirt or debris it picks up. Also called a whirlwind, it develops best on clear, dry, hot afternoons."
Gambale told Mother Jones that he was just relaxing in the park with friends when it occurred. "It was amazing," he said. "I had my ... double rainbow' moment."​

As for the guy who ran into the middle of it? "He just got all dusty," Gambale says.

Other crazy weather in Hawaii:
13 PHOTOS
Rainbow falls plus Tropical storm Iselle and Hurricane Julio
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Dust devil touches down in Brooklyn park
Rainbow Falls in Wailuku River State Park, Hilo, Hawaii (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
Amazing sight here in Hilo, HI. The Wailuku River rose 13 feet in just 12 hours, says @WXmel6. http://t.co/i253kQSnXA
Rainbow Falls in Hilo is raging in the wake of #Iselle (via @weatherchannel): http://t.co/bEL6CHt7D8 http://t.co/GNKUoRFJFD
NOAA satellite loop of Tropical Storm Julio taken on Wedesday, August 6, 2014. Both Julio and Hurricane Iselle are heading for Hawaii in an unusual one-two punch of Pacific tropical storm systems.
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image of a very active Eastern and Central Pacific, hosting three tropical cyclones (from left to right) Genevieve, Iselle and Julio.
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Wednesday, August 6, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in an unusual one-two punch of Pacific tropical storm systems.
NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image of Hurricane Iselle over the Pacific Ocean at 10:40 a.m. Hawaiian daylight time on August 4, 2014.
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 6: In this handout provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) from the GOES-East satellite, four separate weather system (L-R) Halong, Genevieve, Iselle, and Julio are tracked in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of the United States pictured at 0z on August 6, 2014. High pressure from the North is forcing Hurricane Iselle, with top winds of 85 miles and Hurricane Julio, with winds of 75 mph towards the islands of Hawaii. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Thursday, August 7, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in a rare case of back-to-back hurricanes for Hawaii. Iselle will be the first hurricane to hit Hawaii in 22 years.
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Wednesday, August 6, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in an unusual one-two punch of Pacific tropical storm systems.

NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Thursday, August 7, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in a rare case of back-to-back hurricanes for Hawaii. Iselle, expected to make landfall Thursday night, will be the first hurricane to hit Hawaii in 22 years.

On Aug. 5, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite captured natural-color images of both Iselle and Hurricane Julio en route to Hawaii. This image is a composite of three satellite passes over the tropical Pacific Ocean in the early afternoon.
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