Amazing video shows Iselle's impact on the Big Island

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
By MORGAN WHITAKER

Hurricane Iselle was downgraded to a tropical storm before it slammed into Hawaii's Big Island Friday, and so far reports of damage have been relatively few, but new video shows the storm has already had a big impact.

The video captured by Sapience New Cocoon and shared on Facebook Friday shows Wailuku River State Park's Waianuene, better known as Rainbow Falls, flush and raging with the rain dumped by Iselle. The park is located a short distance from downtown Hilo, which is the capital and most populated city on the Big Island.



Not impressed by the tumbling waterfalls? Just check out what they normally look like in the slideshow below. Even after what the Associated Press described as "heavy rain" the falls were practically a trickle in comparison to how massive they appeared today.

13 PHOTOS
Rainbow falls plus Tropical storm Iselle and Hurricane Julio
See Gallery
Amazing video shows Iselle's impact on the Big Island
Rainbow Falls in Wailuku River State Park, Hilo, Hawaii (Photo by Visions of America/UIG via Getty Images)
Amazing sight here in Hilo, HI. The Wailuku River rose 13 feet in just 12 hours, says @WXmel6. http://t.co/i253kQSnXA
Rainbow Falls in Hilo is raging in the wake of #Iselle (via @weatherchannel): http://t.co/bEL6CHt7D8 http://t.co/GNKUoRFJFD
NOAA satellite loop of Tropical Storm Julio taken on Wedesday, August 6, 2014. Both Julio and Hurricane Iselle are heading for Hawaii in an unusual one-two punch of Pacific tropical storm systems.
NOAA's GOES-West satellite captured this image of a very active Eastern and Central Pacific, hosting three tropical cyclones (from left to right) Genevieve, Iselle and Julio.
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Wednesday, August 6, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in an unusual one-two punch of Pacific tropical storm systems.
NASA’s Terra satellite captured this natural-color image of Hurricane Iselle over the Pacific Ocean at 10:40 a.m. Hawaiian daylight time on August 4, 2014.
UNITED STATES - AUGUST 6: In this handout provided by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) from the GOES-East satellite, four separate weather system (L-R) Halong, Genevieve, Iselle, and Julio are tracked in the Pacific Ocean off the west coast of the United States pictured at 0z on August 6, 2014. High pressure from the North is forcing Hurricane Iselle, with top winds of 85 miles and Hurricane Julio, with winds of 75 mph towards the islands of Hawaii. (Photo by NOAA via Getty Images)
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Thursday, August 7, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in a rare case of back-to-back hurricanes for Hawaii. Iselle will be the first hurricane to hit Hawaii in 22 years.
NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Wednesday, August 6, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in an unusual one-two punch of Pacific tropical storm systems.

NOAA satellite loop of Hurricane Iselle and Hurricane Julio taken on Thursday, August 7, 2014. Both are heading for Hawaii in a rare case of back-to-back hurricanes for Hawaii. Iselle, expected to make landfall Thursday night, will be the first hurricane to hit Hawaii in 22 years.

On Aug. 5, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) sensor on the Suomi National Polar-orbiting Partnership (NPP) satellite captured natural-color images of both Iselle and Hurricane Julio en route to Hawaii. This image is a composite of three satellite passes over the tropical Pacific Ocean in the early afternoon.
HIDE CAPTION
SHOW CAPTION
of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE


Related coverage:
Hurricane Categories
Hurricane Katrina
Hurricane Safety Procedures
Weather Tracker
Hurricane Tracker
Hawaii Weather Forecast
Read Full Story

From Our Partners