Thailand to junta: Please change your soundtrack

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Thailand to junta: Please change your soundtrack
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha prays during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha holds flowers during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) salutes while reviewing a guard of honour as part of the military anniversary at 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha adjusts his cap during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha waves before leaving after attending 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers parade during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army Chief Prayut Chan-O-Cha walks during the military anniversary's 21st Infantry Regiment in Chonburi province on August 21, 2014. Thailand's junta-picked national assembly chose coup leader General Prayut Chan-O-Cha as prime minister in a one-horse race that entrenched the military's hold on power. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai police major General Naiyawat Phadermchit speaks to the media outside Lat Phrao police station in Bangkok on August 19, 2014. Thai authorities said that they were testing the DNA of a Japanese man at the centre of a 'baby factory' scandal to determine if he is the biological father. AFP PHOTO / Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Protesters confront soldiers in riot gear blocking the route of an anti-coup march on May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai capital has seen several anti-coup rallies since the military seized control on May 22. Thailand's ruling military has declared martial law that bans public assembly and imposes a night-time curfew. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Thai army soldiers are briefed by an officer before deploying to an anti-coup rally on May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The Thai capital has seen several anti-coup rallies since the military seized control on May 22. Thailand's ruling military has declared martial law that bans public assembly and imposes a night-time curfew. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: People gather to make anti-coup protest in Bangkok, Thailand on 24 May, 2014. Soldiers do not intervene protestors although anti-coup protest is forbidden in Thailand. (Photo by Vinai Dithajohn/Anadolu Agency/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Thai military wear riot shields as tensions increase during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24: Protesters holds signs during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 24; Thai protesters fight with police and military trying to arrest them during an anti-coup protest on the second day of Thailand's military coup May 24, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. Thailand's coup leaders they will continue to detain former Prime Minister Yingluck Shinawatra, along with Cabinet members and other anti-government protest leaders for up to a week. Thailand has seen many months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. Thailand is now experiencing it's twelfth coup with seven attempted previous coups. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
An anti-coup protester is taken away from the site of a gathering by Thai soldiers in Bangkok on May 24, 2014. Thailand's military will detain former premier Yingluck Shinawatra and ousted government leaders for up to one week, the army said on May 24, tightening its grip over the country following a coup that has provoked an international outcry. AFP PHOTO / Christophe ARCHAMBAULT (Photo credit should read CHRISTOPHE ARCHAMBAULT/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: A woman uses a phone to capture Thai army soldiers securing the grounds of the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 22: Press pose for a portrait with Thai army soldiers standing guard at the grounds of the venue for peace talks between pro- and anti-government groups on May 22, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army chief announced in an address to the nation that the armed forces were seizing power amid reports that leaders of the opposing groups attending the talks were being detained by the military. Thailand has seen months of political unrest and violence which has claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Thai soldiers stand guard after army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha met with anti-government and pro-government leaders at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 22, 2014. Thailand's army chief announced in an address to the nation on Thursday that the armed forces were seizing power after months of deadly political turmoil. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai Army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha (C) speaks next to Navy chief Narong Pipatanasai (L) and Air Chief Marshal Prajin Jantong (R) during a press conference at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates prior to a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai army chief General Prayut Chan-O-Cha gives a traditional greeting to delegates during a meeting at the Army Club in Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in central Bangkok and censoring the media but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO / PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL (Photo credit should read PORNCHAI KITTIWONGSAKUL/AFP/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A Thai army soldier stands guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers patrol the offices of the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby photo Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: View of a gun mounted on a Thai army vehicle as soldiers stand guard on a busy city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Passersby pose for a photo with Thai army soldiers standing guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A foreign tourist poses for a photo as Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: Thai army soldiers stand guard on a city centre street after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
BANGKOK, THAILAND - MAY 20: A Thai army officer briefs soldiers standing guard outside the National Broadcasting Services of Thailand after martial law was declared on May 20, 2014 in Bangkok, Thailand. The army imposed martial law across Thailand amid a deepening political crisis that has seen six months of protests and claimed at least 28 lives. (Photo by Rufus Cox/Getty Images)
Royal Thai Army soldiers keep watch from a military vehicle while stationed outside the Royal Thai Police headquarters as traffic drives past in central Bangkok, Thailand, on Tuesday, May 20, 2014. Thailand's army imposed martial law nationwide after months of political turmoil that brought down an elected leader and tipped the economy into a contraction. Photographer: Dario Pignatelli/Bloomberg via Getty Images
Thai army soldiers take a break from checkpoint near where pro-government ''Red shirts'' have been rallying for days on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law across the deeply divided kingdom on May 20 to restore order after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in the capital but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
Thai army soldiers take a break at a checkpoint near where pro-government ''Red shirts'' have been rallying for days on the outskirts of Bangkok on May 20, 2014. Thailand's army declared martial law across the deeply divided kingdom on May 20 to restore order after months of deadly anti-government protests, deploying armed troops in the capital but insisting the move was 'not a coup'. AFP PHOTO/ Nicolas ASFOURI (Photo credit should read NICOLAS ASFOURI/AFP/Getty Images)
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By JOCELYN GECKER
Associated Press

BANGKOK (AP) -- First Thailand's junta seized power, then they commandeered every TV channel for round-the-clock broadcasts of dour announcements and patriotic hymns. The public's verdict: DJ, please change the soundtrack.

And after about 24 hours, they did.

As the sun set on Bangkok Friday night, Thailand's sappy soap operas flickered back on just as suddenly as they'd vanished a day earlier. After a full day of marching music and military ballads of a bygone era, things returned to normal - at least on television.

In this day and age, it's not surprising that the generals who launched Thailand's coup have set up a Facebook page.

But it was a sign of the times that the junta's vintage tunes didn't resonate with the Facebook generation.

"Since you're reforming politics, you might as well reform your music," said one of many postings on the page, which had over 220,000 likes by Friday afternoon, up exponentially from earlier in the day.

Song requests poured in - for Justin Timberlake, Michael Jackson, the Disney hit "Let It Go," and for foot-tapping Thai folk music.

"Please give us something more uplifting," said another comment on the page, which bears the junta's self-declared name: National Peace and Order Maintaining Council.

The running commentary offered a lighthearted and lively sideshow to the otherwise dramatic events unfolding in Thailand, where the military declared martial law on Tuesday and then announced two days later it was overthrowing the government.

The country's powerful army chief, Gen Prayuth Chan-ocha, justified the coup as a means of restoring stability and avoiding more violence in a crisis that has left 28 dead and hundreds injured since it escalated seven months ago.

But some on social media joked that the nationalistic hymns could unleash old aggressions.

"Play other songs, will you! Your marching music is making me so patriotic that I want to wield a sword and slash some Burmese!" - a reference to Thailand's historical enemy and neighbor, now known as Myanmar.

The Facebook page was created Tuesday to post the military's announcements and edicts. But the complaints started streaming in Thursday when the martial music replaced all broadcasts on television and radio stations. There was no apparant crackdown on the criticism, despite an order that asked social media sites to suspend services if any messages opposed the coup makers.

Not all the postings were about music.

While schools were ordered closed Friday, parents posted pleas for the return of children's channels: "Can I have my TV back? At least the cartoon channel for my kid? It won't hurt national stability," said one father.

One woman posted a picture of a smiling shirtless soldier and asked: "Do you know if he has a girlfriend? I like him."

The coup Thursday was the 12th since the end of absolute monarchy in 1932.

One comment on the Facebook page suggested that when this coup is over, it would be nice to have a musical souvenir: "When it all comes to an end, don't forget to make a CD."

---

Associated Press writer Thanyarat Doksone in Bangkok contributed to this report.

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