'Hitler album' of stolen art donated to US archive

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'Hitler album' of stolen art donated to US archive
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
The last known leather-bound Hitler Album is pictured after its unveiling during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
Robert Edsel, Chairman of the Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art, and author of 'The Monuments Men' answers a question after unveiling the last known leather-bound Hitler Album during a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
National Archives senior conservative Morgan Zinsmeister arranges the last known leather-bound Hitler Album to display for a press conference at the National Archives in Washington, DC, on May 8. 2014. To mark the May 8 anniversary of the end of World War II in Europe in 1945, the National Archives unveiled the Hitler Album of art works stolen by the Nazis during the war. The Monuments Men Foundation donated to the National Archives this album, which was found at Hitler's home in Berchtesgaden, Germany, in the closing days of the war and has since been in private hands. AFP PHOTO/Jewel Samad (Photo credit should read JEWEL SAMAD/AFP/Getty Images)
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WASHINGTON (AP) - Adolf Hitler's last known album of artworks stolen by the Nazis during World War II is being donated to the National Archives to mark the anniversary of the war's end in Europe.

The leather-bound "Hitler Album" joins dozens of others recovered by the U.S. Army to identify and return stolen art. The album being turned over to the archives Thursday catalogued French collections.

The story of the Army's effort to trace and return looted art was made famous by the movie "The Monuments Men" starring George Clooney and Matt Damon.

The Monuments Men Foundation is donating the album to the archives with one of the last surviving "Monuments Men" who was part of the real recovery team.

It's not clear whether any new information can be gleaned from the album.

'Hitler Album' of Stolen Art Given to US Archive

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