Vice reporter detained in Ukraine speaks with NBC

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Vice Reporter Detained In Ukraine Speaks With NBC

After being held captive in eastern Ukraine, Vice journalist Simon Ostrovsky spoke to NBC about his three-day ordeal.

"It felt like a really long time. ... I had no idea anybody, um, knew where I was being held. ... I think the reason they took me was to stop me reporting, so I'd really like to go back."

Once released, Ostrovsky was met by a camera crew from Canada's CBC. They gave him a ride out of Slavyansk, where he had been held. Vice has the video.

Ostrovsky: "If you can drive me home, it would be even more of an exclusive."

CBC: "Sure. How is the situation?"

Ostrovsky: "It's f-ed up. Spent four days in a basement with three or four other guys."

According to Russian news site Gazeta, it was Slavyansk's pro-Russia militia who took Ostrovsky.

Led by the mayor of Slavyansk, the group reportedly told the reporter's parents that "Nobody abducted him, nobody is holding him hostage, he's with us now in at the SBU, preparing material and working."

Ostrovsky and his cameraman had just finished interviewing a man who showed them his Russian passport - sensitive information in Ukraine - and was stopped at the last checkpoint before their hotel.

The Ukrainian kidnapping is the latest incident in an increasingly dangerous zone for journalists.

Last week, Time reported one of its correspondents, along with four other reporters, was detained for an hour by a pro-Russia militia.

And it was Ostrovsky himself who had been tweeting about journalist mistreatment by Slavyansk's mayor hours before his kidnapping, writing, "Sloviansk pro-Russia 'mayor' threatens to throw journalist out for 'provocative' question."

Ostrovsky has stated his desire to return to the region, but for now Vice has declined to comment any further.

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Vice reporter detained in Ukraine speaks with NBC
This picture taken on April 21, 2014 shows US journalist Simon Ostrowsky (C) working in front of the City Hall of Slavyansk. The US State Department said it was 'deeply concerned' on April 23, 2014 over reports that an American journalist was kidnapped by pro-Russian separatists in Ukraine. Pro-Moscow insurgents in Slavyansk -- an eastern Ukrainian town which has become a tense flashpoint in recent days -- are holding two journalists, an American working for Vice News, Simon Ostrovsky, and a Ukrainian working for a pro-Kiev outlet, Irma Krat. AFP PHOTO / STRINGER (Photo credit should read STRINGER/AFP/Getty Images)
US journalist Simon Ostrovsky, who was abducted and held by pro-Kremlin rebels in east Ukraine this week, steps out of a van as he arrives in a hotel in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk after being freed, on April 24, 2014. Ostrovsky told AFP he was freed today. Simon Ostrovsky, who works for the online outlet VICE News, said that he was fine, although he had been beaten after being grabbed late on April 14 in the flashpoint town of Slavyansk and was initially kept tied up and blindfolded. AFP PHOTO/ ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
US journalist Simon Ostrovsky, who was abducted and held by pro-Kremlin rebels in east Ukraine this week, speaks on a mobile phone as he arrives in a hotel in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk after being freed, on April 24, 2014. Ostrovsky told AFP he was freed today. Simon Ostrovsky, who works for the online outlet VICE News, said that he was fine, although he had been beaten after being grabbed late on April 14 in the flashpoint town of Slavyansk and was initially kept tied up and blindfolded. AFP PHOTO/ ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
US journalist Simon Ostrovsky, who was abducted and held by pro-Kremlin rebels in east Ukraine this week, arrives in a hotel in the eastern Ukrainian city of Donetsk after being freed, on April 24, 2014. Ostrovsky told AFP he was freed today. Simon Ostrovsky, who works for the online outlet VICE News, said that he was fine, although he had been beaten after being grabbed late on April 14 in the flashpoint town of Slavyansk and was initially kept tied up and blindfolded. AFP PHOTO/ ALEXANDER KHUDOTEPLY (Photo credit should read Alexander KHUDOTEPLY/AFP/Getty Images)
This picture taken on October 8, 2004 shows US journalist Simon Ostrovsky, then correspondant stringer for the AFP, in Moscow. The US State Department said it was 'deeply concerned' on April 23, 2014 over reports that an American journalist was kidnapped by pro-Russian separatists in Ukraine. Pro-Moscow insurgents in Slavyansk -- an eastern Ukrainian town which has become a tense flashpoint in recent days -- are holding two journalists, an American working for Vice News, Simon Ostrovsky, and a Ukrainian working for a pro-Kiev outlet, Irma Krat. AFP PHOTO / ALEXANDER NEMENOV (Photo credit should read ALEXANDER NEMENOV/AFP/Getty Images)
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