Artist creates amazing display with table salt

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Artist Creates Amazing Display With Table Salt

A unique art display is being crafted at Weber State University in Ogden.

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Motoi Yamamoto
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Artist creates amazing display with table salt
Artist Motoi Yamamoto works on his latest saltwork in the Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium at the Mint Museum Uptown on Monday, February 18, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. Yamamoto is creating the temporary large-scale work out of salt entitled Floating Garden in the buildings atrium from February 18th through March 1st. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Artist Motoi Yamamoto works on his latest saltwork in the Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium at the Mint Museum Uptown in Charlotte, North Carolina, Monday, February 18, 2013. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Artist Motoi Yamamoto stretches before beginning work on his latest saltwork in the Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium at the Mint Museum Uptown on Monday, February 18, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Nippon television photojournalist Noriko Shirasawa, left, photographs artist Motoi Yamamoto as he prepares to begin work on his latest saltwork in the Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium at the Mint Museum Uptown on Monday, February 18, 2013, in Charlotte, North Carolina. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
Artist Motoi Yamamoto works on his latest saltwork in the Robert Haywood Morrison Atrium at the Mint Museum Uptown in Charlotte, North Carolina, Monday, February 18, 2013. (Jeff Siner/Charlotte Observer/MCT via Getty Images)
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It resembles the image of a tropical storm, similar to what you would see on a satellite shot during a weather forecast. But the intricate piece of work is being crafted with ordinary table salt.

It is the vision of internationally claimed artist Motoi Yamamoto, and its title is "Floating Garden."

"We became aware of the work and we thought the connection to the Great Salt Lake, to our culture and economy around here would make it a perfect fit for us," said Visual Arts Department Chair Matt Choberta.

Yamamoto has meticulously spent more than 10 hours a day for the past week on the floor of Weber State's College of Arts and Humanities carefully crafting his vision.

In Japanese culture, salt is often used as a healing agent to aid in dealing with grief, a process Yamamoto knows all to well since the death of his sister.

"My sister died by brain cancer, brain tumor, in 1994," he said.

The Morton Salt Company was so moved by Yamamoto's idea, it donated more than 250 pounds of their famous product to use as his artistic medium.

The artwork will remain on display at Weber State for all to see until April 12, before its disbursement into the Great Salt Lake.



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