CACI Awarded $75 Million Prime Contract to Support U.S. Air Force Contingency Medical Logistics Worl

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CACI Awarded $75 Million Prime Contract to Support U.S. Air Force Contingency Medical Logistics Worldwide

Continuing Work Includes U.S. Army and Air National Guard

ARLINGTON, Va.--(BUSINESS WIRE)-- CACI International Inc (NYSE: CACI) announced today that it has been awarded a $75 million prime contract (one base year and four option years) by the U.S. Air Force to sustain Expeditionary Contingency Medical Materiel (ECMM) Support Services. The contract continues work performed in support of medical logistics services in the U.S. at all levels of the Air Force, Army, and the Air National Guard, with coverage now including Alaska, Japan, and Guam. This award expands CACI's growth in its Healthcare and Logistics and Material Readiness market areas.


ECMM Support Services are responsible for identifying and communicating medical manpower and equipment planning data for all Air Force combat and support forces. CACI will deliver a comprehensive range of contingency medical logistics support for forces serving in theater and deployed Department of Defense and service personnel in various locales within the U.S. and overseas. This support includes building and maintaining deployable medical assemblages across the globe; fulfilling urgent medical requirements in combat zones; sustaining medical logistics for deployed units and forces; and augmenting medical logistics to meet requirements for natural and man-made events within the U.S.

With this award to CACI, the Air Force benefits from the company's highly experienced personnel, proven processes, and extensive capabilities to provide medical requirements necessary to support U.S. forces as well as to build and deploy medical logistics solutions as assembled units. At the Air Force's 340,000-square-foot facility in San Antonio, Texas, CACI builds, maintains, and deploys medical assemblages varying in size from portable backpack sets to fully equipped hospitals. CACI provides staffing at 29 sites where assemblages are stored across the continental U.S. and deploys them to support operations anywhere in the world, at any time. In addition, assemblages can be deployed in support of humanitarian relief efforts for disasters such as the 2004 Asian tsunami and the 2010 earthquake in Haiti.

John Mengucci, CACI's Chief Operating Officer and President of U.S. Operations, said, "CACI's ongoing work for the Air Force's Expeditionary Contingency Medical Materiel Support Services reinforces our position as an industry leader in supporting the operational and IT needs of the federal healthcare logistics community. It's a strong vote of confidence in the top-notch people and innovative solutions we provide to fulfill our customers' missions."

According to CACI President and Chief Executive Officer Ken Asbury, "Our in-depth experience as a major provider of U.S. Air Force and Army medical assemblages in support of every major contingency operation and disaster in the last decade integrates closely with CACI's strategic focus on healthcare as a high-growth area. We're pleased that our dedicated work with Air Force ECMM Support Services will continue to play such a vital role in sustaining the missions of our Armed Forces."

CACI provides information solutions and services in support of national security missions and government transformation for Intelligence, Defense, and Federal Civilian customers. A member of the Fortune 1000 Largest Companies and the Russell 2000 Index, CACI provides dynamic careers for approximately 15,000 employees working in over 120 offices worldwide. Visit www.caci.com.

There are statements made herein which do not address historical facts, and therefore could be interpreted to be forward-looking statements as that term is defined in the Private Securities Litigation Reform Act of 1995. Such statements are subject to factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from anticipated results. The factors that could cause actual results to differ materially from those anticipated include, but are not limited to, the risk factors set forth in CACI's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2012, and other such filings that CACI makes with the Securities and Exchange Commission from time to time. Any forward-looking statements should not be unduly relied upon and only speak as of the date hereof.

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CACI International Inc
Corporate Communications and Media:
Jody Brown, Executive Vice President, Public Relations
(703) 841-7801
jbrown@caci.com
or
Investor Relations:
David Dragics, Senior Vice President, Investor Relations
(866) 606-3471
ddragics@caci.com

KEYWORDS:   United States  North America  Virginia

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