4 Manufacturing Jobs Making A Comeback

manufacturing jobs coming back

The recession has decimated many fields, but the manufacturing sector -- once given up for dead -- is making a big comeback, thanks in part to a revived U.S. auto industry.

It's greatest among computer-controlled machine tool operators, an occupation that now has more workers than in 2007, according to a new study by Economic Modeling Specialists Intl. and CareerBuilder (an AOL Jobs sponsor). Machinists, engine assemblers and other production jobs also are on the upswing, nearing their pre-recession employment levels.

The report, which includes data for employees as well as self-employed workers, culled from more than 90 national and state employment resources, found four major areas of re-emerging jobs:


Overall, CareerBuilder reports, manufacturing increased by 4 percent from 2010 to 2012. The jobs site notes these findings, in particular, from the report:

  • Primary metal manufacturing added 47,000 new jobs (13 percent growth), at employers such as iron and steel mills, steel product manufacturing and foundries.
  • Fabricated metal product manufacturing employment rose by 124,000 new jobs (10 percent growth), including shipping containers, forging and stamping, and machine shops.
  • Machinery manufacturing increased by 118,000 new jobs (12 percent growth), including mining, agricultural machinery, engine and turbines, and plastic and rubber machinery manufacturing.
  • Transportation equipment manufacturing grew by 140,000 new jobs (10 percent growth), at businesses that make cars, motor vehicle bodies, motor vehicle parts, railroad stock, and to a lesser degree, aerospace.


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