10 Federal Taxes You Might Not Realize You're Paying

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The time of year when many taxpayers log into their tax software program, or receive a call from their tax accountant, and receive a happy surprise: They're getting a tax refund.

Unfortunately, not all surprises are so pleasant. For instance, in March, the independent Tax Foundation published the 2014 edition of its annual Facts & Figures: How Does Your State Compare? tax information booklet. Alongside expected topics, such as rankings of the 50 states by tax burden and taxes paid per capita, was an "Easter egg" surprise of a list of federal excise taxes that you may not be aware you're paying.

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Motley Fool contributor Rich Smith has no position in any stocks directly affected by any of the above excise taxes. At least, he doesn't think he does. But then again, up until a few weeks ago he didn't even realize that most of these taxes existed.

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