What Resigning to 'Spend More Time With Family' Really Means

Laura Vanderkam
Starting the day
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I was scheduled for jury duty this week. Since I hate to cancel things (I find it almost physically painful), I didn't schedule anything for my summons date and several days after. But the night before, I called the court house and learned I had been excused. This left me with several days of found time. The first thought I had was that I should "spend more time with my family" -- before being reminded that when you normally hear this phrase, it's being used as the world's biggest euphemism.

An executive is bored by his job? He's quitting to "spend more time with my family."

A presidential aide is pushed out in a palace coup? He's leaving to "spend more time with my family."

A non-profit leader is unable to deal with his co-workers anymore? He's leaving to "spend more time with my family."