Super PACs Are Super-Fly! ProPublica Rocks an Explanation of Unrestricted Cash

SuperPACsOver the past few months, newspapers, magazines and the Internet have been crammed with stories about super PACs. On the bright side, an ever-larger portion of the voting public has become aware of that the political system has a big, fat loophole that allows unlimited, almost-unrestricted campaign funding. In fact, notable PAC superstars like Sheldon Adelson, Foster Friess and Frank L. VanderSloot have become, if not household names, at least well-known for their contributions to the political process.

Unfortunately, despite the best efforts of Jon Stewart and Steven Colbert -- not to mention much of the news media -- there still seems to be some widespread confusion about how exactly super PACs work, and how they came into being. Recently, investigative journalism website ProPublica and educational music company Explainer Music took the Schoolhouse Rock tack, creating "Oh, Super PACs," a 1970s Super Fly-style video that explains how super PACs are funded. Take a listen:




Bruce Watson is a senior features writer for DailyFinance. You can reach him by e-mail at bruce.watson@teamaol.com, or follow him on Twitter at @bruce1971.

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