U.K. Christians Punished For Wearing Crosses At Work

Claire Gordon
Christians UK discriminated against, not persecuted
Christians UK discriminated against, not persecuted

Two British women who were punished for wearing crosses at work are taking their cases to Strasbourg, France, and the hallowed halls of the European Court of Human Rights. By international treaty, Europeans have the right "to manifest [their] religion or belief." The British Government will argue, however, that wearing a cross isn't protected because it isn't required to be a good Christian.

British Airways suspended one of the women, check-in workers Nadia Eweida, back in 2006 after she refused to conceal her cross necklace as the uniform code required. Eweida lost her religious discrimination case. Four years later the other plaintiff, Shirley Chaplain, who had been a nurse for three decades, was banned from hospital wards when she refused to remove her cross necklace. Her lawsuit failed too.