Don't Get Audited! The IRS's Dirty Dozen Red Flags

Audit
Audit

By Joy Taylor, assistant editor, The Kiplinger Tax Letter

Ever wonder why some tax returns get intense scrutiny from the Internal Revenue Service while most are ignored? The agency doesn't have enough personnel and resources to examine each and every tax return filed during a year -- it audits only slightly more than 1% of all individual returns annually.

So the odds are pretty low that your return will be picked for review. And, of course, the only reason filers should worry about an audit is if they are fudging on their taxes. But even if you have nothing to hide, an audit is no picnic.

Here are 12 red flags that could increase your chances of drawing some unwanted attention:


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Read more: http://www.kiplinger.com/slideshow/tax_audit_redflags/13.html#ixzz1kgDBQ7GI
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