The 10 Best Cities for Educated Workers

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Brigham Young University
Brigham Young University

The job market has remained relatively stagnant since 2009. To make matters worse, the educational requirements of the average U.S. employer have increased consistently from 2005 to 2009, recently outpacing the growth of educated labor, a new report shows. This means that the average job now requires a higher level of education than the average worker possesses -- a bad sign for much of America's labor force.

However, there are a number of metropolitan areas in the country that have exceptionally small education gaps, or "shortages of educated workers relative to employer demand," according to the report "Education, Demand, and Unemployment in Metropolitan America" by the Brookings Institution. These areas tend to have a large number of highly educated workers available to meet rising demand.