10 Questions to Ask Before Paying for Add-On Tax Preparation Services

Taxes online - What's free and what's not
Taxes online - What's free and what's not

With just over a month to go before tax season wraps up, many taxpayers are still mulling their filing options, hoping to find the best deal for tax preparation. As we've posted previously, there are a number of free and low-cost filing opportunities for taxpayers, including the IRS FreeFile program. However, not all taxpayers qualify for FreeFile or feel comfortable using the FreeFile software packages.

If you're one of the millions of taxpayers who use a paid software package from home or a professional tax preparer, how do you know if you're getting the best deal? When is "free" really free? And when does paying extra for services make sense? Here are 10 questions to consider when comparing pricing from one service to the next:

Your resource on tax filing
Tax season is here! Check out the Tax Center on AOL Finance for all the tips and tools you need to maximize your return.
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