Tax Brackets for 2010 Income

Quick way to determine your tax bracketsBy law, the thresholds for the marginal federal income tax brackets must change each year to keep pace with inflation. For 2010, those brackets are as follows:

Individual Taxpayers
  • 10% on taxable income between $0 and $8,375
  • 15% on taxable income between $8,376 and $34,000
  • 25% on taxable income between $34,001 and $82,400
  • 28% on taxable income between $82,401 and $171,850
  • 33% on taxable income between $171,851 and $373,650
  • 35% on taxable income over $373,651
Taxpayers Filing as Married, Filing Jointly or Qualifying Widow(er):
  • 10% on taxable income between $0 and $16,750
  • 15% on taxable income between $16,751 and $68,000
  • 25% on taxable income between $68,001 and $137,300
  • 28% on taxable income between $137,301 and $209,250
  • 33% on taxable income between $209,251 and $373,650
  • 35% on taxable income over $373,651
Taxpayers Filing as Head of Household:
  • 10% on taxable income between $0 and $11,950
  • 15% on taxable income between $11,951 and $45,550
  • 25% on taxable income between $45,551 and $117,650
  • 28% on taxable income between $117,651 and $190,550
  • 33% on taxable income between $190,551 and $373,650
  • 35% on taxable income over $373,651
Taxpayers Filing as Married, Filing Separately:
  • 10% on taxable income between $0 and $8,375
  • 15% on taxable income between $8,376 and $34,000
  • 25% on taxable income between $34,001 and $68,650
  • 28% on taxable income between $68,651 and $104,625
  • 33% on taxable income between $104,626 and $186,825
  • 35% on taxable income over $186,826
These tables indicate your marginal tax rate, meaning the top tax rate at which you pay. Keep in mind that our federal income tax system is progressive -- tax rates increase as taxable income increases. This means each taxpayer reporting the same filing status actually pays tax at the same rate for the same income. So, for example, you and Warren Buffett actually pay the same tax rate on the first $10,000 of taxable income (assuming you have the same filing status).

Tax brackets
are generally announced just before the next tax year begins (for example, these 2010 tax brackets were announced in the fall of 2009). With inflation remaining low, expect to see similar tables next season.

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