20 rules to live by for cheapskates

20 rules to live by for cheapskates
20 rules to live by for cheapskates

Today, to be called a "cheapskate" is more like of a badge of honor. I'm betting a lot of people in Congress would be delighted to be called cheapskates, unlike this situation in the 1920's. And advice columnists today would probably suggest that a guy who doesn't spend too much on a date may be a guy who knows how to manage his money. In that spirit, I consulted my colleagues here at WalletPop and asked them to give me their best advice for living like a cheapskate.

The results were fast and furious. Not surprisingly, our staffers have all kinds of clever ways to save money. Below are WalletPop's 20 rules for cheapskates to live by:

Use technology to help you compare prices and look for coupons.Josh Smith, our resident tech guru and the editor of Notebooks.com, says that if you have a smart phone, "there are plenty of apps that will scan the bar code --- ShopSavvy is one -- and will find the best prices for you. And if you're online, visit RetailMeNot.com and enter the store name to see current coupons."

Think ahead with your child's friends' birthday parties.Bonnie McCarthy, who writes a lot about family and money, suggests that people buy "cool gifts that are age-appropriate to your own darling children." That way, "the next time they're invited to a birthday soiree, you'll have a well-priced gift ready to go." That's a definite help with the "time is money" factor. Plus, if you do buy gifts ahead and really put some thought into it, you might find some good choices on sale, making your inner cheapskate even happier. And you have to love Bonnie's other advice: "Let your child make the birthday card, or craft a simple tag to put on the gift. Unless there's money inside a birthday card, it will be quickly tossed aside by even those with the best manners, and those cards cost upwards for $3 a piece!"