Chemicals in 'antibacterial' soaps said to have more risk than reward

Chemicals in 'antibacterial' soaps said to have more risk than reward
Chemicals in 'antibacterial' soaps said to have more risk than reward

Antibacterial soaps are not only ineffective, but actually harmful to your health, according to a leading environmental group suing the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for failing to better regulate the products.

The Natural Resources Defense Council alleges that for 32 years, the FDA dragged its feet on banning triclosan and triclocarban, two chemicals linked to reproductive harm, from everyday products. The chemicals can also trigger antibiotic resistance and are common in antibacterial soaps.

"Washing your hands with so-called antibacterial soap containing triclosan and triclocarban does nothing different than using regular soap and water," said Jennifer Sass, a senior NRDC scientist. "The idea to have this added level of sanitation is completely unnecessary ... these products do not protect against germs that can get on your hands two seconds after you wash them."