Curbside scavengers find bargains in the rough

Ann Brenoff
Curbside scavengers find bargains in the rough
Curbside scavengers find bargains in the rough

One man's trash is literally another man's treasure. Maybe it's the recession, or maybe it's just a new twist on the old sport of recreational shopping -- where you hunt down bargains because doing so just makes you feel good -- but curbside scavenging has gotten greater respectability lately.

Cindy Bagwell, an assistant news editor at the Dallas Morning News and part-time jewelry-maker, recently discovered the sport. She was working a late shift and had the morning free and decided to investigate what some neighbors who were in the midst of a major remodel were discarding. Taking her dogs out for a walk was the perfect camouflage for the scouting mission.

Her score: a five-drawer wicker dresser in excellent condition and a solid wood door that with some refinishing and sealant will make an excellent dining room table top. Buoyed by the experience, Bagwell roamed a little further into a neighboring community with bigger homes and better cast-offs. This trip yielded a stack of old books that when sold into her favorite used book store got her an $18 credit. Not bad for not much effort.