With masters scholarships, a master's degree could help make workers recession proof

With masters scholarships, a master's degree could help make workers recession proof
With masters scholarships, a master's degree could help make workers recession proof

With recent data showing current unemployment for workers 25 and under approaching "Great Depression" numbers, it should come as no surprise that more students are attending graduate school to delay entering the work force. A bachelor's degree is common, so a master's degree, theoretically, should give you an edge above the competition when seeking employment.

The average graduate student accrues $30, 000 in student loan debt, but there are many options to paying for a master's degree, from Federal Stafford Loans for graduate programs, masters scholarships, grants, or your place of employment can cover your educational costs.

While looking to pay for your master's degree, contacting your school's financial aid department should be your first step in a search for masters scholarships. Your university's financial aid office should be able to direct you to masters scholarships or grants you may be eligible for.

Getting a grant or masters scholarships depends heavily on your choice of major and on your ethnicity and gender. Masters scholarships are more plentiful in nursing (like the Emergency Nursing Association scholarships), teaching, and in fields of scientific research (like the National Science Foundation), for example.