He'll be back: Arnold Schwarzenegger owes the IRS

California Governor Arnold Schwarzenegger owes $79,064.00 in back taxes, according to a federal tax lien filed by the IRS in LA County Superior Court.

The IRS documents show that the actor turned governor owes $39,047 from 2004 and $40,016 in 2005. This seems more likely to be a fluke/oversight than anything more dire. It isn't a lot of money for someone like Schwarzenegger and even if he didn't have the cash, his wife Maria Shriver certainly would.

In another recent case of California's first family embarrassing itself, Maria Shriver has been caught running afoul of the state's traffic laws a few times: failing to feed parking meters, talking on a cell phone while driving, driving without a seatbelt, and Arnold himself was recently caught parking in a no-parking zone.

Still, I suppose there's an outside chance that Schwarzenegger really does have financial woes, and really can't afford to pay $79,000-plus in taxes. If that's the case, Schwarzenegger may have to make a return for the next installment of the Terminator franchise.

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