Aaron Carter tripped up by IRS tax lien

Aaron Carter is having a bad week. Just days after his elimination from Dancing with the Stars' ninth season, news surfaced that Carter was slapped with an IRS lien worth more than $1 million. The liens, which were filed in Los Angeles last week, date back to 2003.

Carter has been trying to repair his bad boy image in recent months, including adding a new management team. Carter's current manager, Johnny Wright, told ET News, "It is unfortunate that while Aaron was a minor, his finances were grossly mismanaged by his previous team which has lead to the current situation of which he was unaware of until today. Aaron is working with a new team to take appropriate actions towards speedy resolution of the matter and looks forward to putting this behind him and moving forward with the next stage of his music career."

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