Ex-Big Leaguer Ron Darling faces half a million in tax liens

Yale grad-turned New York Mets baseball star turned-TBS broadcaster Ron Darling is facing some pretty serious tax trouble: $544,197 in federal and state tax liens. The Detroit News' Tax Watchdog reports on the details:
  • The IRS filed a $71,076 lien against Darling on July 29 in the New York City Register's office.
  • The state of New York filed a $12,664 tax warrant against Darling on May 23 in the New York County Clerk's office.
  • The state of California filed an $84,860 lien against Darling on June 6, 2008, in Contra Costa County Court.
  • The IRS filed a $375,597 lien against Darling on May 15, 2008, in the New York City Register's office.
Darling has declined comment requests from a number of media outlets, and a Turner Broadcasting representative declined the Detroit News' request for comment, noting that the tax liens are a "personal issue."

The good news for Darling (and the IRS) is that he's busy working. Just a couple of days after media reports about the liens started to surface, he was back in the booth for the Dodgers' NLCS match-up with the Phillies.

Also in Darling's favor? His financial problems do not appear to be as serious as former teammate Lenny Dykstra's, who recently filed for bankruptcy.

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