How to lower obesity, fatten wallet, at Chinese buffets

Aaron Crowe

The costs of obesity are enormous, and not just in health care costs, such as increasing medication expenses 77% for someone who is obese.

Along with emotional and social effects, obesity can affect your wallet. Obese men and women earn, on average, $7,093, or about 25% less than their peers.

One American passion commonly blamed for obesity are the all-you-can-eat Chinese buffets, or any type of buffet that lets customers eat as much as they want. Sure, they can be cheap and save you money on dining, but in the long-term, overeating at such places can be hazardous to your physical and financial health.

Two researchers recently studied eating behaviors at all-you-can-eat Chinese buffets, and found methods that skinnier people use, such as using chopsticks, and habits of heavier people, such as sitting facing the buffet.