Older workers retooling, finding more satisfaction in new jobs

Tom Barlow

This recession has cost many older workers their jobs. However, according to a study just released by the American Association of Retired People (AARP), the long-term consequences for those people might be positive.

The 14-year study found that a huge 91% of respondents who changed jobs at the age of 50 or later reported they were happy with their new jobs.

Ironically, many of these new jobs lack many of what we usually consider the attributes of a top-notch job. They don't pay as well, don't include bountiful benefits, including pensions, and don't require total 24/7 dedication. They are, however, considerably less stressful. 36% of those surveyed consider their new job stressful, vs. 65% in their previous jobs.