Tea parties, IRS excuses and other taxing strategies

As tax day once again casts a pall across the land, a collection of supposedly spontaneous tax protests have swept the country. Meanwhile, ordinary taxpayers are falling victim, once again, to the belief that there are legitimate ways to get out of paying one's debt to society. While the sun sets on America's national day of responsibility, it's worthwhile to take a deep breath and think about the one day when every American is called to national duty.

Grover Norquist, President of Americans for Tax Reform, has announced that more than 2,000 so-called "Tea Parties" are scheduled to take place over the course of this week. These events, inspired by Rick Santelli's famous rant on the floor of the Chicago Board of Trade, are designed to protest tax increases. Of course, the Obama administration recently unveiled one of the largest tax cuts in history, but Norquist claims that these "very sophisticated" protests are in anticipation of tax increases that will likely come about because of current spending.

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