The IRS pictures the happy family fun of paying taxes

Quick: What's the first thing that comes to mind when you think about paying taxes?

If you're like me, you probably don't envision a smiling group of multicultural friends clustered around a picnic table. But if you're the IRS, that's the best image to illustrate the topic of tax information for individuals. Move on to the page for businesses, and you get a nice stock photo of two businessmen shaking hands -- presumably celebrating the bonuses they just received courtesy of the taxes you paid.

It's hard to blame the IRS for the use of such insipid photographs. In a world where herpes medication is sold with a picture of a hunky guy snuggling his girlfriend, it seems clear that the federal government web design hacks were operating on autopilot, unaware of the irony of showing people pictures of smiling families while they try to figure out just how much of their cash they're supposed to send in to help build a Lawrence Welk museum in North Dakota.

But still I wonder: How much money did the IRS spend for the rights to those photos? Even if it was only a couple dollars, it seems like a pretty good place to cut wasteful spending.

Why not sell advertising on the IRS site to General Motors?

Should I Include a Dependent's Income on My Tax Return?

It may be easier and less expensive to include dependents' income on your tax return rather than have them file their own return—in certain circumstances.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

Great Ways to Get Charitable Tax Deductions

Generally, when you give money to a charity, you can use the amount of that donation as an itemized deduction on your tax return. However, not all charities qualify as tax-deductible organizations. While there are many types of charities, they must all meet certain criteria to be classified by the IRS as tax-deductible organizations. There are legitimate tax-deductible organizations in many popular categories, such as those listed below.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

Tax Tips After January 1, 2019

TurboTax gives you ten tax saving tips for the new year. Find strategies to lower taxes, save money when preparing your tax return, and avoid tax penalties.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

Should You and Your Spouse File Taxes Jointly or Separately?

Married couples have the option to file jointly or separately on their federal income tax returns. The IRS strongly encourages most couples to file joint tax returns by extending several tax breaks to those who file together. In the vast majority of cases, it's best for married couples to file jointly, but there may be a few instances when it's better to submit separate returns.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com
Read Full Story