Tax Tips: Where to file your return

This will be the last official "Tax Tips" post for this tax season. If I haven't helped you by now, I don't think there's much help I can offer you. So for this final post about taxes, I offer you one of the most important pieces of information. Where to file your tax return.

The IRS makes it easy for you. You can start on this page and then select the option that fits your tax situation. For individuals, you select your state of residency, and then you're given a list of addresses depending on which form you're filing.

And if you're still not done with your taxes, your best bet is to probably file an extension. With this form, you'll get an extra six months to file your taxes. But if you will owe money, make sure you send it with your extension. The longer you wait to pay, the more interest and penalties you will pay in the end.

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

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