Tips for Tax Procrastinators: Set aside some time for your taxes

Part of getting your taxes done is just taking the time to actually do them. You and your taxes need some quality time together in order to get the task done, so try to set aside some time to focus. There is nothing worse than trying to organize your tax documents with a bunch of distractions.

You don't have to do it all at once, but offer yourself blocks of uninterrupted time (maybe in 30 or 60 minute increments) to work on the taxes without television, telephone, email, kids, or other distractions. You'll find that you're much more productive and efficient when you can focus, and your chances of making mistakes go down too.

It's also much easier for you (or your tax preparer) to do the taxes if everything is all together. There's nothing more annoying than finding missing documents here and there. If you can spend some focused time on your taxes, you're much more likely to be able to gather all the important items prior to doing the tax returns.

Read more Tips for Tax Procrastinators

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

Tax Tips After You Retire

Even if your current retirement income plan doesn't provide maximum tax benefits, you can still restructure your payment strategies to optimize your tax results.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

How to Correct Federal Tax Returns

The IRS has a simple process in place that allows you to amend your tax return. Find out how to amend your tax return in this article on tax tips.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

Identity Theft: 7 Steps to Reclaiming Your Identity and Keeping it Safe

As more personal information continues to be stored online, the risk of identity theft also increases. The Bureau of Justice reports that millions U.S. residents experience identity theft each year. If someone uses your personal data pretending to be you, it's a serious crime. With quick, decisive action, you can help discover the fraud, stop further damage and reclaim your identity. Here are six steps to get you on your way.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com

What Are Estate Taxes?

When someone in your family dies owning property, the federal government imposes an estate tax on the value of all that property. The law that governs estates is constantly changing and so the law may be an inconsistent from one year to the next. However, the good news is that the estate tax doesn't usually affect many American taxpayers who aren't in the top 2 percent of the nation's wealthiest people.

Read More

Brought to you by TurboTax.com
Read Full Story