IRS uses YouTube to get out the word about the rebate -- Why?!

The USA Todayreports that, for some reason that is totally beyond me, the IRS has decided that wasting $42 million to mail everyone letters saying they didn't need to do anything special to receive their "economic stiumlus" payment wasn't enough.

No, apparently we need to be subjected to YouTube videos as well -- 4 of them. I just watched 1 of them and, frankly I can't bear any more. This is the worst YouTube video I've ever seen: boring, containing no information, and condescending, all at the same time. See for yourself below: I wonder how much the IRS blew on these videos. So far the video has received only 6,129 views. Perhaps the IRS needs to spend another $42 million to send everyone letters telling them to watch the video to find out that they don't need to do anything except file a tax return to get the rebate.

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