Who won't get a tax rebate check?

As the details of the economic stimulus plan are circulated, it's become clearer who will and won't get a rebate check. Most everyone will get a check of some amount...with the exception of the following people who will not get checks:

  1. If you don't file a 2007 tax return, you won't get a check.
  2. If your qualifying income is less than $3,000, you won't get a check. Qualifying income includes social security, wages, net income from self-employment, combat pay, and veterans payments. (Supplemental Security Income -- SSI -- does not count as qualifying income.)
  3. If you are claimed as a dependent on someone else's return, you won't get a check. So college students being claimed by mom and dad won't get a check.
  4. If you don't have a valid social security number, you won't get a check.
  5. If you are a nonresident alien, you won't get a check.
  6. If you file form 1040NR, 1040NR-EZ, 1040PR or 1040SS, you won't get a check.
More details on the plan are found on this page from the IRS, so you can read up and determine if you're getting a check and how much it might be. (I've already answered my quota of "will I get a check" and "how much will I get" questions for 2008!)

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

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