Tax Tips: Checking on your refund

You've filed your tax return and now you're anxiously awaiting your refund. If you want to check on the status, you can do so at the IRS website. You'll need to have certain information in hand to be able to check it, including: your Social Security Number, your filing status (single, married filing joint, married filing separate, head of household, or qualifying widow), and the exact amount of the refund that was on your tax return.

If you need help finding any of this information on your return, you can access this help screen.

Remember: The fastest way to get your refund is to file electronically and request direct deposit of your refund into your bank account. You can usually get your refund in under 2 weeks this way. And if you qualify, you might even be able to file your taxes online for free.

Tracy L. Coenen, CPA, MBA, CFE performs fraud examinations and financial investigations for her company Sequence Inc. Forensic Accounting, and is the author of Essentials of Corporate Fraud.

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