9 amazing hair products that are probably sitting in your fridge

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
Before you go close icon
Hair products at home
See Gallery
9 amazing hair products that are probably sitting in your fridge
Avocados are perhaps best known for making guacamole — one of our favorite snack foods of all time, but its nutrients also make it an incredibly rich deep conditioner. The omega-3 fatty acids; vitamins A,D, E, and B6; magnesium; copper; and iron in avocados encourage hair growth and moisturize dry, brittle strands.

Try mixing avocado with a few other kitchen ingredients for two hair masks, one for moisture and one for strength.

Crack open a six-pack, kick back, and . . . wash your hair? That's right, your favorite after-work beverage is also a great cleanser. The alcohol and hops make great astringents that can help wash out product buildup and dirt. Catherine Zeta-Jones has been a fan of the beer wash for years.

Set aside a can of beer and let it reach room temperature. Shampoo your hair as usual, then pour the beer steadily into your hair, message, rinse, and then finish by conditioning.

One way to help cut back on your sugar intake? Use it to make hair spray instead. Whatever's left over from making your last batch of chewy sugar cookies can go into a simple spray that will give the same hold as store-bought options minus all the hazardous chemicals.

All you have to do is mix half a cup of almost-boiling water with 1 teaspoon of white sugar and pour into a bottle. It's that simple. Add another teaspoon of sugar if you want a stronger hold — you can even add in sea salt to give your hair some texture. The best part of this DIY hair spray (besides the fact that it's free and supersimple)? The sugar won't leave a sticky residue.

Coconut oil is a great alternative to vegetable or olive oil when making dishes with a sweet or exotic flair, like this curry pumpkin soup. Wanna know what else it can effectively substitute? Your expensive deep conditioner. The fatty acids in coconut oil make it a great conditioner for both your hair and scalp. It's long been used as a beauty product by Polynesian cultures, and now it's your turn to give it a go.

Melt 2 teaspoons of coconut oil by placing a small cup in a bowl of hot water. Massage the melted oil into your scalp and strands, comb to distribute, and put your hair into a bun and under a shower cap. Leave in for at least an hour or overnight. After shampooing to rinse the oil out, you should be able to feel a noticeable difference.

Lemons are a staple of Summer drinks and add the perfect zing to any dish, but they're also a great natural beauty product. You've probably heard of the hairhighlighting trick using lemons, but the citric fruit is also great for banishing flakes.

Combine 2 tablespoons of fresh-squeezed lemon juice, 2 tablespoons of olive oil, and 2 tablespoons of water and massage mixture into scalp. Leave in for 20 minutes and then rinse. The acidity in the lemons will loosen any dandruff on your scalp while the olive oil will moisturize it.

Honey is not just great for soothing throats or satisfying taste buds; it can also do wonders for your tresses. The natural humectant will help dry hair retain moisture.

For chlorine-damaged hair, mix honey with vinegar and rosemary oil for this easy clarifying spritz. For sun-damaged hair, apply a half cup of honey on its own into clean, damp hair, or mix with avocado or egg yolk for extra conditioning properties.

One of the most common household ingredients that nearly everyone has in their fridge or pantry is also secretly a great hair cleanser. When your shampoo is not enough to get rid of all the product buildup and residue in your strands, try mixing 1 to 2 tablespoons of baking soda with water until a thick paste forms. Massage into damp hair and leave in for 15 minutes before shampooing as usual.

Now that we're deep into Fall, many of us have probably had our fill of sweet potato pie, but that doesn't mean we have to say goodbye to the root vegetable until next year. Use it on your mane instead.

Sweet potatoes are packed with vitamins C and E, which are great for rehydrating hair. Combine one part plain yogurt with two parts cooked, mashed sweet potato and a few tablespoons of olive or coconut oil for a deep conditioner. Massage into hair, leave in for 20 minutes, and rinse.

Everyone knows that eggs are packed with protein, which help energize us in breakfast foods like omelets and frittatas. But the protein in eggs can also do wonders for repairing damaged hair. Additionally, the fats in egg yolk will help condition dry hair, while the enzymes in egg whites will get rid of oil. It's like a one-stop shop for solving all your hair problems.

Mix an entire egg (or just the egg yolk if you want to condition and just the whites if you want to degrease) with 2 tablespoons of olive oil and one cup of water to create a hair mask. Massage the mixture into your scalp and leave on for 15 to 20 minutes before rinsing.


Put down that credit card and step away from the computer. You don't need to buy yet another $50 deep-conditioning mask. That's because, chances are, you already have a whole spa's worth of hair products at your fingertips, or at least in the next room. Behind your refrigerator doors are food items that will not only go great in that new dip recipe, but also make your locks shiny, soft, and strong.

Just this week, Blake Lively revealed that mayonnaise is one of the secret ingredients in her hair care arsenal, telling beauty site Byrdie that she puts the white stuff on the ends of her hair to prevent shampoo from drying them out. If the condiment has anything to do with the way that girl's hair looks, I'll have what she's having. Scientifically it makes sense, because the same nutritional properties that make these ingredients so desirable in dishes also make them powerful conditioners, cleansers, and fortifiers.

From avocado to beer, here are nine culinary ingredients you can multitask to give store-bought hair products a run for their money.

More from Popsugar:
Read Full Story

People are Reading