CEOs' Handsome Paydays

CEOs' Handsome Paydays
It can't be said that there's no connection between performance and compensation; Blankfein's tenure at Goldman shows some correlation. In 2007, he took home a staggering $68.5 million -- the record for investment banker compensation. After the bailouts, Blankfein's pay dropped to $600,000 in 2008, and $1 million in 2009 (still a relative pittance). It rebounded in 2010, however, reaching $25.6 million, but fell back to around $12 million after Goldman's profits dropped in 2011. But the relationship between CEO quality and salary is not always clear: This year, Blankfein lead the way among big bank execs with $26 million, despite job and compensation cuts at Goldman.
In 2012, Dimon's pay was cut in half from the previous year, reflecting the $6.2 billion trading loss out of JPMorgan's London office (and a resultant Senate report saying the bank had mislead shareholders and regulators). He still got a healthy $11.5 million.
The founder and leader of Capitol One (COF) earned $17.5 million last year. Bloomberg considers him the most overpaid bank CEO.
No. 1 U.S. home lender Wells Fargo (WFC) had a banner year, banking a record $18.9 billion profit. Stumpf, who denies the existence of "a subsidy or unfair advantage from being perceived as too big to fail," took home $19.3 million. He currently chairs the Financial Services Roundtable, Wall Street's lobbying arm.
Outside the world of banks, the U.S. Justice Department on Friday announced its opposition to American Airlines' proposed $20 million severance for CEO Tom Horton. The carrier, owned by parent AMR Corp. (AAMRQ), is merging with US Airways Group (LCC); Horton became CEO when American filed for Chapter 11 bankruptcy protection in November 2011. But even though American wants to give him all that cash, plus lifetime flight benefits, Horton won't actually be joining the ranks of the unemployed: The plan is to make him chairman of the combined company after the merger.

As the Associated Press explained, "Bankruptcy law limits severance payments to executives and aims to make sure companies can repay as much of their debt as possible." The government's objection observed that, according to previous filings by American, Horton would have received at most $6.4 million if he had left at the end of 2012. Why so much more money now? American's board should have to explain how the $20 million figure was determined, the trustee's office says. And guess who the chairman is: one Thomas W. Horton. Bankruptcy court will consider the question on June 4.
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