Wall Street This Week: HubSpot's IPO, Darden's Troubles

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Richard Drew/APTraders on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange on Friday.
From one of last year's hottest initial public offerings checking in with new quarterly financials after cooling off in 2014 to a new IPO trying its luck on the New York Stock Exchange, here are some of the things that will help shape the week that lies ahead on Wall Street.

Monday -- Contain Your Excitement

The new trading week kicks off with The Container Store (TCS) reporting quarterly results. Things haven't gone well for the housewares retailer since shortly after it went public at $18 a share last November.

It was a hot debut, with the retailer's stock peaking at $47 a few weeks later, but it has gone on to shed more than half of its value since then. Earnings have fallen short of expectations in the past two quarters, and that's not a welcome trend heading into Monday afternoon's report.

Tuesday -- Drive Through

International Speedway (ISCA) follows with its latest financials on Tuesday morning. The motorsports promoter behind Daytona, Talladega and other storied race tracks is expected to post a profit barely above break-even, but it has managed to exceed analyst estimates in three of the past four quarters. Those same pros see a 7 percent uptick in revenue.

Wednesday -- Seed Money

Everyone seems to have an opinion on Monsanto (MON). Bulls will argue that modified seed traits that create more bountiful harvests are tackling world hunger, making farming a viable business. Bears argue that GMOs don't belong in our food supply, potentially causing long-term health risks.

It's against this controversial backdrop that Monsanto reports quarterly results on Wednesday. This is a seasonal business, as you can probably imagine, and this is Monsanto's historically weakest quarter.

Thursday -- Hub and Spoke

There should be a new member of the 2014 IPO class when HubSpot begins trading on the New York Stock Exchange under the ticker symbol HUBS. The provider of a cloud-based marketing and sales software platform should begin trading on Thursday shortly after the market opens.

HubSpot has been posting operating losses for years, but the IPO should still appeal to growth stock investors willing to forgive today's red ink for the sake of heady growth. HubSpot saw its revenue soar 50 percent last year to $77.6 million.

Friday -- Olive Branch

One of the more interesting annual shareholder meetings of 2014 will take place on Friday morning, when Darden Restaurants (DRI) hosts its yearly event. An activist investor has taken issue with Darden's sloppy performance at Olive Garden and the unloading of Red Lobster at what it deems a fire-sale price.

Starboard Value has offered up a competing slate of nominees to reshape the Darden board, and you know that it's going to be close since Darden has been pushing out news releases in recent days to encourage investors to vote for their hand-picked board members.

Motley Fool contributor Rick Munarriz has no position in any stocks mentioned. The Motley Fool recommends International Speedway and The Container Store Group and owns shares of The Container Store Group. Try any of our Foolish newsletter services free for 30 days. To read about our favorite high-yielding dividend stocks for any investor, check out our free report.

15 Important Expenses That You Forgot to Plan For
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Wall Street This Week: HubSpot's IPO, Darden's Troubles
Is your water bill due quarterly? Figure out how much you need to save each month to have enough to pay for the bill when it comes, and put that amount aside each month so you'll be prepared. Do the same for any bills due regularly but not monthly.
Bills you only have to pay once a year can be even harder to remember, so be sure to note things like property taxes, auto registration fees and insurance premiums and budget for them as well.
Annual subscriptions and memberships regularly trip up people's budgets. Be sure to set aside money each month for things like:
  • Newspaper and magazine subscriptions.
  • Gym memberships.
  • Warehouse club memberships.
  • Union dues.
  • Road service membership fees.
Other expenses don't happen on a regular basis, but you can still predict the need to pay for them over the course of the year. Chief among these are repair and maintenance expenses, with the biggest ones being car-related costs (oil changes, inspections, new brakes or tires, etc.) and home costs (leaky faucets, spring-time yard work, etc.).
Some home repairs go beyond the scope of "routine" and require a significant amount of money in reserve. These can include replacing your roof, installing new windows or doing a major home renovation. You can anticipate the need for most of these repairs before you have to make them, so be sure to start budgeting for them in advance.
You also need to repair and maintain your body, so factor in medical costs like annual physicals, eye exams and dental checkups, as well as co-pays and prescriptions costs if you have any ongoing conditions.
If you plan to purchase any large items in the foreseeable future, from appliances to a new car, make sure you're putting aside enough each month to pay for them in cash. It's always best to pay for big-ticket items upfront rather than finance them (unless you can get a fantastic discount by financing and can pay the balance in full before any interest kicks in).
From birthdays to holidays, there are plenty of special occasions each year to budget for. Make sure to include:
  • Birthday gifts.
  • Holiday gifts.
  • Anniversary gifts.
  • Party hosting costs.
  • Dinner costs if you take someone out to celebrate.
  • Wedding expenses (gifts, travel, hotel stays, etc.).
Your four-legged family members also need to be part of your budget. Pet care costs to consider include:
  • Food and treats.
  • Toys.
  • Vet bills and medications.
  • Grooming.
  • Boarding or pet sitting.
Do you take an annual vacation? Travel twice a year to visit family for the holidays? Set aside money each month for any travel-related costs such as airfare, hotels, meals, rental cars and souvenirs.
Whether you run a business or simply a household, there are certain expenses you may need to plan for in the business category. These can include:
  • Tax preparation fees and tax payments.
  • Conferences.
  • Trips.
  • Continuing education.
  • Dues for professional organizations.
Whether you give annually to a charity of your choice or like to have some money set aside for your friends' and family's fundraisers, make sure to allocate enough each month to cover these donations
A good budget allows for a little "free" spending money you can do with as you please. It can be $20 a month for fancy coffee at your favorite coffee shop or $100 a month to feed your favorite hobby. The amount doesn't matter so much as the fact that you're allowing yourself a little guilt-free fun to keep your budget from feeling too restrictive.
Depending on your lifestyle, your eating out and entertainment budget could be a little or a lot. Whether you prefer to have dinner out once a weekend or see a movie every few weeks, figure out how much you'd ideally like to have and then examine any budget categories you can tweak to make room for it. If you realize you need to cut back on your habits a little to save money, that's fine too-at least you're aware of it now so you can act accordingly.
Even if you're not a clothes horse, chances are there are certain items you'll need to purchase throughout the year. These can include:
  • Updated work clothes.
  • A new coat, hat and other accessories come winter.
  • A new bathing suit for the summer.
  • New shoes as yours wear out.
  • Back-to-school clothes for your kids.
Calculate your annual spending on all clothing and accessories and divide that amount by 12 to determine how much you should be putting aside each month.
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