Who made Kate and William's Wedding Cake?

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Who made Kate and William's Wedding Cake?
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Who made Kate and William's Wedding Cake?

On October 23, William and Kate celebrated the christening of Prince George by serving guests slices of fruit cake saved from their wedding cake. In an interview with HELLO! Online, Fiona Cairns, the baker behind the royal couple's eight-tiered wedding cake, reveals what it was like to bake for the royal couple and the surprising number of personal touches by Kate.

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Back in 2011, there was speculation that the top two layers of the wedding cake would be saved for this very tradition. Now that the rumor has proven true, Fiona describes the experience as "exciting."

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"It's always been a tradition and that's why the cake was fruitcake, because after 30 months it's even more delicious," Fiona explains.

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During Fiona's initial meeting with Kate to discuss the wedding cake, Fiona came prepared with mood boards and samples and the pair discussed recipe development.

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However, Fiona credits the entire wedding cake as Kate's idea, down to the little details like the types of flowers and the lace pattern.

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According to the Daily Mail, the project took Fiona Cairns and her team five weeks to complete. The wedding cake was an eight-tiered sight to behold and catered to Kate's request to use a special cake decoration technique that involved piping three-dimensional scroll work, flowers and other embellishments.

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"She gave me a list of 17 different flowers and leaves that she wanted on the cake," Fiona recalls. But, the future duchess was by no means a bridezilla, telling Fiona later that she didn't mean for her to use all 17 kinds on the cake. "[Kate] wasn't expecting it all," Fiona says.

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Fiona reveals, "Each flower had a meaning to her and every part of the cake was personal. We were given a piece of lace from her dress, but we didn't know it at the time, so we copied that onto the cake."

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The cream and white confection featured nearly 900 sugar-paste flowers. The bottom of the cake had piped ivy leaves, symbolizing marriage, and the bottom three tiers were decorated with daisies (representing innocence), lace work, sweet William (which express the sentiment "grant me a single smile") and lavender, according to the Daily Mail.

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Some flowers on the cake were national symbols, like white roses (England), daffodils (Wales), shamrocks (Ireland) and thistle (Scotland). Several wished for good fortune and future happiness (apple blossom and white heather), and others were symbolic of love (orange blossom, honeysuckle, myrtle and bridal rose).

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The top tier cake, which had been saved for Prince George's christening, featured piped decorations of the four flowers of the home nations, as well as lace details, lily of the valley (for sweetness and humility) and heather (for protection).

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When the wedding cake was finished the day before the wedding in the Picture Gallery at the Royal Palace, Fiona found it hardest to leave the cake behind. "After all those weeks and the emotion that had gone into it, and then to leave it there—it was quite difficult, not sad, just difficult," Fiona shares.

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It wasn't until after a phone call on the day of the wedding from the Queen's pastry chef, "saying that the cake was beyond William and Kate's expectations," that Fiona could breathe easy.

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Fiona also heard from Kate after the wedding when the cake and dress were displayed at Buckingham Palace.

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Fiona had already been well-known in London for making bespoke cakes, but the royal wedding catapulted her business into a worldwide sensation.

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Since the wedding, Fiona has received press interest for interviews and television appearances from many countries, especially America, Brazil and France.

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The wedding cake from their nuptials, which took place in April 2011, made its reappearance at Prince George's christening party as part of a British tradition of couples freezing the top layer of their wedding cake to serve it during their first-born's baptism.

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In a Daily Mail article, Fiona withheld sharing the entire recipe for the wedding cake but did reveal a few key ingredients including raisins, cherries, grated citrus fruits and French brandy. Fruitcakes are often soaked in spirits, which helps the cake retain moisture and last for long periods of time.

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On October 23, William and Kate celebrated the christening of Prince George by serving guests slices of fruit cake saved from their wedding cake. The cake from their nuptials, which took place in April 2011, made its reappearance as part of a British tradition of couples freezing the top layer of their wedding cake to serve it during their first-born's baptism. In an interview with HELLO! Online, Fiona Cairns, the baker behind the royal couple's eight-tiered wedding cake, reveals what it was like to bake for the royal couple and the surprising number of personal touches by Kate.

Check out the slideshow above to discover cake designer Fiona Cairn's once-in-a-lifetime experience creating the royal wedding cake.

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