What You Should Be Afraid Of This Halloween

Before you go, we thought you'd like these...
9 PHOTOS
What You Should Be Afraid Of This Halloween
See Gallery
What You Should Be Afraid Of This Halloween

If you were a trick-or-treater in the 70s and 80s, you were likely terrified by tales of treats which could kill you–razor blades in apples, straight pins in chocolate bars and poison in peppermints. Visions of menacing criminals behind neighborhood doors, just waiting to harm innocent witches and superheroes, struck fear in kids and parents alike. Turns out most, if not all, of these stories were urban legend.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Now that I am a grown up, I am fairly sure I also don’t have to fear Jason and Freddy.

Image Credit: Getty Images

The real danger you need to watch out for this Halloween are accidents, both big and small.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Young kids on sugar highs, older kids up to mischief and costumes with lots of moving parts, combined with an early sunset, increased traffic on the streets and a general sense of fun and frivolity can be a recipe for disaster.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Avoid trips and spills.

  • Watch out for long hems, slippery shoes and accessories kids can trip over.
  • Bring a pair of sneakers, because no matter how great those heels look with the princess dress, she will be begging to take them off. Even Cinderella couldn’t run in her glass slippers.
  • If costumes have lots of parts, pull a wagon or carry a large shoulder bag, so you can unburden your kids. Little hands holding lots of candy and costume pieces are less likely to break a fall.
  • Stick to well-lit streets, and carry flashlights.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Burns are a common reason for ER visits on October 31st. Flammable materials, wigs, and dragging pieces can spark easily.

  • Look for flame-resistant costumes.
  • Use battery powered candles in your pumpkins.
  • Don’t leave any lit candles unattended.

Image Credit: Getty Images

Eye injuries can result from Darth Vader’s light saber, a princess wand or a ninja sword.

  • Stick to soft, flexible props
  • Educate kids on the danger of wielding a weapon
  • Leave the swords and sticks in hand for the photo, but leave them at home for the trick-or-treating

Image Credit: Getty Images

Finally, my greatest Halloween fear--car accidents. Car accidents involving pedestrians are four times as prevalent and fatal accidents involving kids occur twice as often on Halloween.

  • Avoid masks, especially at night. Opt for makeup instead. Masks block vision making it more difficult to spot oncoming traffic.
  • Use reflective tape on costumes, especially dark ones.
  • Have kids wear glow necklaces and bracelets as part of the fun.
  • Go out early, and keep young kids on a tight leash.
  • Don’t jaywalk. As tempting as it may be to run across the street to the house giving out full-sized Snickers, cross at the crosswalk.
  • Monitor what older kids are doing, and provide options other than roaming the streets.
  • DRIVE CAREFULLY, every day but especially on Fright Night.

Image Credit: Getty Images

of
SEE ALL
BACK TO SLIDE
SHOW CAPTION +
HIDE CAPTION

If you were a trick-or-treater in the 70s and 80s, you were likely terrified by tales of treats which could kill you-razor blades in apples, straight pins in chocolate bars and poison in peppermints. Visions of menacing criminals behind neighborhood doors, just waiting to harm innocent witches and superheroes, struck fear in kids and parents alike. Turns out most, if not all, of these stories were urban legend.

The real danger you need to watch out for this Halloween are accidents, both big and small.

Check out the slideshow above to discover four accidents you should watch out for this Halloween.

Read Full Story

Sign up for Best Bites by AOL and receive delicious recipes delivered to your inbox daily!

Subscribe to our other newsletters

Emails may offer personalized content or ads. Learn more. You may unsubscribe any time.

People are Reading

Search Recipes