What Is Peach Cobbler?

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Barbecue season is here! Which means burgers, hot dogs and sweet, sweet desserts. Pies are a classic, but what about cobblers? Among the most summery of the dessert spread is a peach cobbler. Since peaches are in season during the hot summer months, making peach cobblers is an excellent way to use up an abundance of beautifully ripe peaches to enjoy after dinner!

Where Did Cobbler Come From?

Pie is much older than cobbler. When the early English settlers came to the the American colonies, they were unable to make their traditional pies. Instead, they made due by tossing together biscuits or dumplings with a layer of stewed fruit and cooking them over a fire. The word "cobbler" may come from the archaic word "cobeler" meaning "wooden bowl," but the origins are uncertain.

What is the Difference Between Crisp, Crumble and Cobbler?

Crisps and crumbles consist of a fruit mixture on the bottom of the pan with a topping made of nuts, oats, graham crackers or bread crumbs. Peach crisp is also delicious. On ther other hand, cobblers are often topped with a batter, biscuit or pie crust and filled with a sweetened fruit like apples, berries or peaches.

How to Choose the Best Peaches

The ideal peaches for cobbler are very ripe. It's even delicious to use overripe peaches for cobbler, but when doing so, sometimes a little bit more flour is required.

Using Canned or Frozen Peaches

It's fine to use canned or frozen peaches for cobbler, but ideally it's better to use fresh fruit. As mentioned above, cobbler is one of those desserts that can make use of overripe fruit that you'd rather not toss.

Image Credit: Getty Images

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