The One Thing Your Doctor Wants You To Quit (And 5 Ways To Do It)

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The One Thing Your Doctor Wants You To Quit (And 5 Ways To Do It)
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The One Thing Your Doctor Wants You To Quit (And 5 Ways To Do It)

1. Don’t Add It If You Can’t Taste It

As a rule, I don’t add salt to boiling water for pasta or potatoes. I prefer to add salt to a dish when its impact will be strongest—usually at the end of cooking. A little salt goes a longer way if it’s sprinkled on a food just before serving; you’ll taste it in every bite.

2. Use Sea Salt

Even if you’re watching your sodium intake, you can enjoy sea salts. While gram for gram sea salts contain as much sodium as table salt, their larger crystals and unique flavors, derived from various sources, may result in your using less salt overall, says Chef Kyle Shadix, M.S., R.D., director at Nutrition + Culinary Consultants in New York City.

3. Use Fresh Ingredients Whenever You Can

You’ll save umpteen milligrams of sodium by making your own sauces and soups, and simmering dried beans until soft (rather than opening a can). Make these staples more convenient by cooking them in big batches, and freezing in single-serving portions for later use.

4. Use Convenience Foods Wisely

Opt for frozen (unsauced) vegetables rather than canned—and when you can’t, seek out low- or reduced-sodium varieties. Rinse the foods in a colander before using to get rid of some of the salt.

5. Look For Low-Sodium Products

A can of soup or broth, or any food really, with a “reduced sodium” label may actually have as much sodium as a “regular” version of another brand. The term “reduced sodium”—also called “lower sodium”—is regulated by the FDA and means only that the product contains at least 25 percent less than its original version. If you’re really watching your intake, look for “low sodium” on the label.

Looking for some healthy alternatives to seasoning your dishes? Click through to find some inspiration.

1. Lemon

Click here for a zesty recipe using lemon: Grilled Trout with Lemon-Caper Mayonnaise

2. Pepper

Feeling pepper-inspired? We have just the dish. Click here: Pan Seared Pork Chops with Green Peppercorn Sauce

3. Fresh Garlic

Click here for a recipe that brings fresh garlic to life: Broccoli and Penne Garlic Pasta

4. Onion Power

For a fabulous recipe using onion powder, click here: Grilled Fish Tacos

5. Lime Juice

Ready for a mouth-watering recipe using lime juice? Click here: Mock Ceviche

6. Mustard

Check out our tasty mustard recipe: Honey Mustard Turkey Cutlets & Potatoes

7. Soy Sauce

Click here for one of the ultimate soy sauce recipes: Soy-Braised Turkey with Turkey Rice

8. Cranberries

Click here for a tantalizing cranberry recipe: Turkey with Pecan Cranberry Stuffing

9. Honey

Click here for a honey recipe: Honey-Soy Broiled Salmon

10. Orange Juice

Click here to unlock a wonderful recipe featuring orange juice: Sesame-Crusted Tuna with Ginger Cream

11. Sesame Seeds

Click here to see how sesame can play a role in your next dish: Roasted Cauliflower and Sesame Spread

12. Rosemary

Click here to view a delectable rosemary recipe: Rosemary Potato Focaccia Rolls

13. Thyme

Click here to view a "thymeless" recipe: Grilled Balsamic and Garlic Flank Steak

14. Basil

In the mood for something juicy with a twist of basil? We have just the trick. Click here: Cherry Tomato Tart with Basil


By: Brierley Wright

I read a seriously startling study that changed the way I eat. The British Medical Journal that reported that researchers found that reducing sodium intake slashed cardiovascular-disease risk by 25 to 30 percent. That's a big deal! Most Americans consume more than twice the recommended daily sodium limit of 2,300 milligrams—the amount in just 1 teaspoon of table salt. The New York City Health Department launched a program to encourage manufacturers to cut sodium in packaged foods in half—a plan that could save 150,000 lives nationwide, every year. You can launch your own campaign to cut back on sodium and do your heart good.

Check out the slideshow above to see the five easy ways to cut sodium from your diet.

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