How to Make a Soufflé

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How to Make a Soufflé
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How to Make a Soufflé

1. Yolk-free whites

Separate the eggs, using an egg separator if desired. Drop each white into a small bowl before adding to the mixing bowl; discard any whites with specks of yolk, wash the bowl and start over.

2. Well-coated dish

Soufflés rise best when they have something to "grab" onto as they bake. Coat the inside of the baking dish generously with breadcrumbs or sugar.

3. Don’t overbeat

The perfect egg whites for soufflés are stiff, hold their shape on the beater but don’t look overly dry or lumpy. Overbeaten whites don’t provide enough structure and result in a sunken soufflé.

4. Use a light hand

Overmixing breaks the tiny air bubbles in the beaten egg whites. Without the air, the soufflé won’t rise. It’s better to undermix than overmix; it’s OK if a few streaks of egg white remain.

Put our tips to the test with these eight soufflé recipes!


Image Credit: jupiterimages

Best-Ever Cheese Soufflé

You're only one hour away from the delicious taste of freshly grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese with this soufflé!

Click here for the recipe: Best-Ever Cheese Soufflé

Pineapple & Ham Bread Soufflé

A bread pudding-soufflé hybrid, this dish gets its inspiration from a rich, pineapple soufflé traditionally served as an accompaniment to baked ham. We turned it into a main dish, putting the ham straight into the soufflé.

Click here for the recipe: Pineapple & Ham Bread Soufflé

Spinach & Feta Soufflé

This elegant spinach and feta soufflé gets its inspiration from spanakopita, the classic Greek pie made with phyllo pastry. Serve with olive oil-roasted potatoes and a tomato-cucumber salad tossed in a lemony dressing.

Click here for the recipe: Spinach & Feta Soufflé

Twice-Baked Goat Cheese Soufflés on a Bed of Mixed Greens

If you'd love to wow your guests with a soufflé but can't stand the last-minute heat, this is your recipe. The soufflés bake once, fall, and revive on a second round in the oven. They emerge modestly puffed, soft and tender.

Click here for the recipe: Twice-Baked Goat Cheese Soufflés on a Bed of Mixed Greens

Wine Soufflé

White wine makes this soufflé just as sweet as it is filling.

Click here for the recipe: Wine Soufflé

Broccoli & Goat Cheese Soufflé

This elegant broccoli and goat cheese soufflé will wow your family and friends. Soufflés are surprisingly easy to make. The only trick is getting them on the table before they deflate.

Click here for the recipe: Broccoli & Goat Cheese Soufflé

Asparagus-Goat Cheese Soufflés

Puffy and warm, these asparagus-goat cheese soufflés are the perfect meal. Serve them alongside a big salad with a tangy vinaigrette for a light supper or a special brunch.

Click here for the recipe: Asparagus-Goat Cheese Soufflés

Asiago, Artichoke & Spinach Soufflé

Try this rich-tasting cheese, artichoke and spinach soufflé recipe for your next brunch. If you can’t find artichoke bottoms, you can substitute regular canned artichoke hearts instead. Just be sure to pat them dry.

Click here for the recipe: Asiago, Artichoke & Spinach Soufflé

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By: Patti Cook, M.S., Ed.D.


My first soufflé, enjoyed at Tavern on the Green in New York's Central Park in 1977, was a masterfully prepared dessert flavored with Grand Marnier. It arrived at the table beautifully puffed and still billowing steam. When I gently dipped my spoon into it and took a bite, it was so light I felt like I was eating a cloud.

Soufflé is a French word that literally means "puffed up" or "filled with air," but for many Americans, it carries with it the connotation of being difficult to prepare. That's certainly what I thought until I learned how easy it is to make soufflés at home. And they aren't just for dessert—I make savory soufflés for brunch or a light supper.

Our master soufflé recipe uses tried-and-true EatingWell techniques to make it healthier: We use canola oil in place of some of the butter, more egg whites and fewer yolks, low-fat dairy and whole-grain flour. You don't have to be a chef to make a fancy-looking soufflé, but you'll feel like a culinary pro when you bring one out of the oven for the first time.

Check out the slideshow above for four tips for soufflé success along with recommended recipes!

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